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Friday, August 03, 2012

Today in Labor History

Today in #LaborHistory: Aug 3 -via- unionist.com

Uriah Smith Stephens born in Cape May, NJ. A tailor by trade, in 1869 he led nine Philadelphia garment workers to found the Knights of Labor - 1821

"Returning to Philadelphia in 1858, he became a member of the Garment Cutters' Association in 1863 and, after its dissolution in 1869, joined with several cutters to launch the Knights of Labor." - from http://www.history.umd.edu/Gompers/Stephens.htm

The following text accompanies the photo below at www.ExplorePAHistory.com : "Forced by poverty to leave his training for the Baptist ministry, Uriah Stephens (1821-1882) became a tailor in Philadelphia. In 1869 Steffens led the founding of the “Nobler and Holy Order of the Knights of Labor,” a secret organization steeped in ritual and a radical Christian belief in the fraternity of all workers, regardless of race, religion, craft, or gender. Steffens led the Knights of Labor until 1879 when he was succeeded by another Pennsylvanian, Scranton mayor Terence Powderly."


SOURCE: Union Communications Services, Inc.

August 02The first General Strike in Canadian history is held in Vancouver, organized as a one-day political protest against the killing of draft evader and labor activist Albert “Ginger” Goodwin, who had called for a general strike in the event that any worker was drafted against their will - 1918

Hatch Act is passed, limiting political activity of executive branch employees of the federal government - 1939

August 03
Uriah Smith Stephens born in Cape May, NJ. A tailor by trade, in 1869 he led nine Philadelphia garment workers to found the Knights of Labor - 1821

Fighting breaks out when sheriff’s deputies attempt to arrest Wobbly leader Richie “Blackie” Ford as he addressed striking field workers at the Durst Ranch in Wheatland, Calif. Four persons died, including the local District Attorney, a deputy and two workers. Despite the lack of evidence against them, Ford and another strike leader were found guilty of murder by a 12-member jury that included eight farmers - 1913

Florence Reece dies in Knoxville, Tenn. at 86. She was a Mine Workers union activist and author of "Which Side Are You On?", written after her home was ransacked by Harlan County county sheriff J.H. Blair and his thugs during a 1931 strike - 1986
[Which Side Are You On? The Story of a Song is a wonderful childrens’ book that tells the story of a song written in 1931 that has become an anthem for people fighting for their rights all over the world. Florence Reece’s husband Sam, a coal miner in Kentucky, was helping organize a union when all hell broke loose. The company and its hired thugs started attacking miners and their homes, including Reece’s. While bullets flew around her and the couple’s seven children and they took cover under their bed, Florence took out her pencil and started writing – and the song was born. Graphic novelist Christopher Cardinale brings Florence’s triumphant story to life in true anarchist style. In the UCS bookstore now.]

15,000 air traffic controllers strike. President Reagan threatens to fire any who do not return to work within 48 hours, saying they "have forfeited their jobs" if they do not. Most stay out, and are fired August 5 - 1981


Today in #LaborHistory: Aug 2 -via- unionist.com

The first General Strike in Canadian history is held in Vancouver, organized as a one-day political protest against the killing of draft evader and labor activist Albert “Ginger” Goodwin, who had called for a general strike in the event that any worker was drafted against their will - 1918

"Workers in Vancouver marked Goodwin's funeral on Aug. 2 with B.C.'s first general strike." - from http://www.carpentersunionbc.com/Pages/gingergoodwin.html
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Pictured below is Goodwin's funeral procession, rumored to have been 1.5km long ....

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