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Friday, October 26, 2012

Today in Labor History

October 26  --  SOURCE: Union Communications Services, Inc.

After eight years and at least 1,000 worker deaths -- mostly Irish immigrants -- the 350-mile Erie Canal opens, linking the Great Lakes and the Atlantic Ocean. Father John Raho wrote to his bishop that "so many die that there is hardly any time to give Extreme Unction to everybody. We run night and day to assist the sick" - 1825

Working Class Heroes shared a link.
We need to raise minimum wage in this country, did you know it is $10 an hour in Canada and they complain about that, we need to end the working class poor -Mel
http://labornotes.org/2012/10/missouri-labor-takes-poverty-business-cements-alliances?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=facebook
 

 
Today in #LaborHistory: Oct 26, 1825 -via- 'Rip & Ron'

The Erie Canal - known as "Clinton's Big Ditch" - opened on this date. Construction had begun on July 4, 1817 and utilized shovels, horses, and thousands of laborers. The canal connects Lake Erie and points west to New York harbor by way of the Hudson River. Shipping and travel costs and times were greatly reduced upon its completion.

"The sound of cannon shot rings through the town. Boom! There it goes again! The music of marching bands floats on the crisp fall air. It's Wednesday, October 26, 1825, and you are in Buffalo, New York. Buffalo is celebrating; in fact, all of New York is celebrating, because today marks the official opening of the Erie Canal." - from http://www.archives.nysed.gov/projects/eriecanal/ec_1825.shtml
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"The Erie Canal is famous in song and story. Proposed in 1808 and completed in 1825, the canal links the waters of Lake Erie in the west to the Hudson River in the east. An engineering marvel when it was built, some called it the Eighth Wonder of the World." - from http://www.eriecanal.org/

"The canal consisted of 85 locks to manage a 500 foot (150 meter) rise in elevation from the Hudson River to Buffalo. The canal was 363 miles (584 kilometers) long, 40 feet (12m) wide, and 4 feet deep (1.2m). Overhead aqueducts were used to allow streams to cross the canal." - from http://geography.about.com/od/urbaneconomicgeography/a/eriecanal.htm
 
Today in #LaborHistory: Oct 26, 1825 -via- 'Rip & Ron'

The Erie Canal - known as "Clinton's Big Ditch" - opened on this date. Construction had begun on July 4, 1817 and utilized shovels, horses, and thousands of laborers. The canal connects Lake Erie and points west to New York harbor by way of the Hudson River. Shipping and travel costs and times were greatly reduced upon its completion.

"The sound of cannon shot rings through the town. Boom! There it goes again! The music of marching bands floats on the crisp fall air. It's Wednesday, October 26, 1825, and you are in Buffalo, New York. Buffalo is celebrating; in fact, all of New York is celebrating, because today marks the official opening of the Erie Canal." - from http://www.archives.nysed.gov/projects/eriecanal/ec_1825.shtml

"The Erie Canal is famous in song and story. Proposed in 1808 and completed in 1825, the canal links the waters of Lake Erie in the west to the Hudson River in the east. An engineering marvel when it was built, some called it the Eighth Wonder of the World." - from http://www.eriecanal.org/

"The canal consisted of 85 locks to manage a 500 foot (150 meter) rise in elevation from the Hudson River to Buffalo. The canal was 363 miles (584 kilometers) long, 40 feet (12m) wide, and 4 feet deep (1.2m). Overhead aqueducts were used to allow streams to cross the canal." - from http://geography.about.com/od/urbaneconomicgeography/a/eriecanal.htm
 

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