Sunday, March 31, 2013

Goodreads acquired by Amazon, perhaps for close to $1 billion - LA Observed

Goodreads acquired by Amazon, perhaps for close to $1 billion - LA Observed

South LA Walk and Rally with Eric Garcetti

Join us for a rally and walk to help get out the vote for Eric Garcetti in South Los Angeles this Saturday, April 6th, at 10:00 AM.
Join us for a rally and walk to help get out the vote for Eric Garcetti in South Los Angeles this Saturday, April 6.

Today in Labor History


President Martin Van Buren issues a broadly-applicable executive order granting the 10-hour day to all government employees engaged in manual labor - 1840

2013.03.25history-emp-law-guide(Every Employee’s Guide to the Law, 3rd Edition goes into solid, useful detail about the federal and state laws that, together with union contracts, are designed to assure fairness and justice in the workplace.  The book discusses issues that have become a larger part of the national consciousness over the past decade, including privacy and e-mail, sexual harassment, age discrimination and the confidentiality of medical records.)

Cowboys earning $40 per month begin what is to become an unsuccessful two-and-a-half-month strike for higher wages at five ranches in the Texas Panhandle - 1883

Cesar Chavez born in Yuma, Ariz.- 1927

Construction begins on the three-mile Hawk’s Nest Tunnel through Gauley Mountain, W. Va., as part of a hydroelectric project. A congressional hearing years later was to report that 476 laborers in the mostly black, migrant workforce of 3,000 were exposed to silica rock dust in the course of their 10-hour-a-day, six-days-a-week shifts and died of silicosis. Some researchers say that more than 1,000 died - 1930

President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs legislation establishing the Civilian Conservation Corps to help alleviate suffering during the Depression. By the time the program ended after the start of World War II it had provided jobs for more than six million men and boys. The average enrollee gained 11 pounds in his first three months - 1933

Wisconsin state troopers fail to get scabs across the picket line to break a 76-day Allis-Chalmers strike in Milwaukee led by UAW Local 248. The plant remained closed until the government negotiated a compromise - 1941

Federal judge Sonia Sotomayor, later to become a Supreme Court justice, issues an injunction against baseball team owners to end a 232-day work stoppage - 1995


March 30

Chicago stockyard workers win 8-hour day - 1918

At the height of the Great Depression, 35,000 unemployed march in New York’s Union Square. Police beat many demonstrators, injuring 100 - 1930
2013.03.25history-harry-bridges

The federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act is enacted - 1970

Harry Bridges, Australian-born dock union leader, dies at age 88. He helped form and lead the Int’l Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) for 40 years. A Bridges quote: “The most important word in the language of the working class is ‘solidarity’” - 1990

Leaders of the Screen Actors Guild announce that the membership has voted to merge with the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, creating the 150,000-member SAG-AFTRA - 2012

 
2013.03.25history-NYSEMarch 29
Ohio makes it illegal for children under 18 and women to work more than 10 hours a day - 1852

Sam Walton, founder of the huge and bitterly anti-union Wal-Mart empire, born in Kingfisher, Okla. He once said that his priority was to “Buy American,” but Wal-Mart is now the largest U.S. importer of foreign-made goods—often produced under sweatshop conditions - 1918

“Battle of Wall Street,” police charge members of the United Financial Employees’ Union, striking against the New York Stock Exchange and New York Curb Exchange (now known as the American Stock Exchange).  Forty-three workers are arrested in what was to be the first and only strike in the history of either exchange - 1948

National Maritime Union of America merges with National Marine Engineers’ Beneficial Association - 1988

Quit Tea 1086008 Stop Smoking


Bad Magic Tricks and a Matter of Trust

by J. Evert Jones and Olivia Rubio

Who is Wendy Greuel?  Does even she know? Let’s take a look:

The last few weeks have certainly been tumultuous for Ms. Greuel.  In a primary campaign where she pulled a $160 million rabbit of “fraud and waste” out of a hat, Ms. Greuel found that her trick wasn’t quite as impressive as she thought. With a lackluster second place finish in the primary and her campaign taking on water, several of Greuel’s campaign staff resigned, most likely uncomfortable with the concept of rearranging deck chairs.

The next part of Greuel’s act is less of a change of campaign strategy than it is a bad sequel to the first act— only this time, instead of dangling money in front of Angelenos, Ms. Greuel switches to using the bling of star power to capture the attention and devotion of this city’s voters.  Picture “The Hangover II”, only with bigger names.

Ms. Greuel has recently collected endorsements like baseball cards, each one more eye-catching than the one before.  Thursday, Greuel was endorsed by Los Angeles Lakers great Magic Johnson, the day before, President Bill Clinton; before that, former Mayor Richard Riordan.  (we hear she’s angling for the Easter Bunny by Saturday).

In the meantime, Ms. Greuel has since engaged in an almost daily ritual of reinventing herself from scratch.  It’s almost like watching television with someone else holding the remote.

Thursday, Greuel cited Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa for failed leadership in Los Angeles.  This happens just days after she hires the Mayor’s own deputy chief of staff to run her campaign.  All while she quietly assembles a host of Villaraigosa supporters and political appointees to help drive her campaign.

One day, Greuel distances herself from the City Council’s decision to increase the minimum retirement age for the City’s unions—a move she, as city controller, endorsed.  The next day, sometime after locking up the unions’ endorsement, Wendy cozies up once again to raising the retirement age. The difference this time is that she intends to cut deeper into her captive union constituency by including workers already under a collective bargaining agreement.  The contradictions, the reversals, and the bad magic tricks she’s using to misdirect the voters’ attention are staggering.

Who is Wendy Greuel?  Does even she know? And if she doesn’t know, how can she be trusted with a city of 12 million people?

Olivia Rubio, MSW
"Truth never damages a cause that is just"
-Mahatma Gandhi

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Chip in 10 and help someone WIN at the Race of Life

Don't miss your chance to BOOK two battle tested, battle proven mentors & life coaches to train and encourage your corporation, school, civic, church, men's or women's group. War Hero, Purple Heart Recipient, motivational speaker Bob Wieland & Hollywood stuntman, speaker, author, businessman & reality show host Sammy Maloof will remind your audiences that its ALWAYS TOO SOON TO QUIT! http://chipin10.com/
 
 

Today in Labor History


Members of Gas House Workers’ Union Local 18799 begin what is to become a 4-month recognition strike against the Laclede Gas Light Co. in St. Louis. The union later said the strike was the first ever against a public utility in the U.S. - 1935

Martin Luther King, Jr., leads a march of striking sanitation workers in Memphis, Tenn. Violence during the march persuades him to return the following week to Memphis, where he was assassinated - 19682013.03.25history-dignity

(All Labor Has Dignity, by Martin Luther King, Jr.: People forget that Dr. King was every bit as committed to economic justice as he was to ending racial segregation. He fought throughout his life to connect the labor and civil rights movements, envisioning them as twin pillars for social reform. As we struggle with massive unemployment, a staggering racial wealth gap, and the near collapse of a financial system that puts profits before people, this collection of King's speeches on labor rights and economic justice underscore his relevance for today. They help us imagine King anew: as a human rights leader whose commitment to unions and an end to poverty was a crucial part of his civil rights agenda.)

Working Class Heroes -- via -- www.unionist.com

Members of Gas House Workers’ Union Local 18799 begin what is to become a 4-month recognition strike against the Laclede Gas Light Co. in St. Louis. The union later said the strike was the first ever against a public utility in the U.S. - 1935 ~De

The gas workers went out on strike at 6:00 a.m. on the twenty-eighth of March. The strike was wholly the decision of the Local’s negotiating committee. Martin Wagner, the President of the Gas House Workers’ Union Number 18799, and Thomas Morley, the Union’s Secretary, had written President William Green on the A.F.L. in December of 1934 asking for support if a strike had to be called, but had received no confirmation. William Brandt, secretary of the Central Trades and Labor Union, had not been consulted. The strike came as a complete surprise to Laclede Company. The first that the company officers knew of the strike was when they reported to work and were greeted by pickets around the Laclede Building. 

The union, however, did not call the strike without advanced preparation. They had invited a man by the name of Mike Dunn from Minneapolis, Minnesota to publish a daily strike bulletin. Dunn and his two brothers had put out a daily bulleting called the Organizer during a successful Teamster strike in Minneapolis from June to September of 1934. The gas workers quietly brought him and a man named Satir from Chicago in from out of town and they, along with David Burbank, a local member of the Workers’ Party, published a daily bulletin from the very first day of the strike until June 18th – when they began to print only three times a week.

On Friday March 29th, Mayor Bernard Dickmann tried to intervene and offered a proposal that would have recognized the Union as the exclusive bargaining agent, but did not guarantee a closed shop-nor did it deal with the new demand of the strikers that a seventy-five cents charge for service calls that was to go into effect on April 1st be dropped. The company pointed to the rising costs as the reason for the service charge but the Union opposed it because they saw it as a way to reduce the service calls, and thereby reduce the labor force in the service department. The Union rejected the Mayor’s proposal on March 31st, and voted to maintain demands for a closed shop and free service calls. This rejection and restatement of demands apparently set the tone for the rest of the strike that was to last until July 15th. The lines were sharply drawn with each side at the other’s throat and neither side willing to conciliate or temper their demands.
 

City Councilmember Jan Perry Endorses Eric Garcetti for Mayor 2013

Today, I'm honored to have earned the endorsement of my friend, City Councilmember Jan Perry.

Jan Perry to appear Thursday with Garcetti - LA Observed

Jan Perry to appear Thursday with Garcetti - LA Observed

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Wednesday Afternoon in the Blogosphere

Los Angeles Times Retirees Roger Howl and Bert Badajos



Paywalls rise - Reuters

No news isn’t good news - The Economist

As director Harper exits, a less diverse board - Gannett Blog

Proposed legislation could kill newspapers - Pomerado News

Daily Orange: Be Fruitful and Multiply - Syracuse New Times

Behind the paywall: lessons from US newspapers - The Guardian

Postal Rallies: “Save Saturday Mail Delivery!” - Frying Pan News

Looking For 'Oxygen,' Small Papers Erect Digital Pay Walls - NPR

Magazines explore alternate options if Sat. Mail Deliveries end - Editors Weblog

Auto writer’s test drive ends when $54k Ram truck goes up in smoke - Romenesko

Today in Labor History


Mother Jones is ordered to leave Colorado, where state authorities accuse her of “stirring up” striking coal miners - 1904

U.S. Supreme Court rules that undocumented workers do not have the same rights as Americans when they are wrongly fired - 2002




Working Class Hero -- via -- www.unionist.com
U.S. Supreme Court rules that undocumented workers do not have the same rights as Americans when they are wrongly fired - 2002 ~De

Hoffman Plastic Compounds, Inc. v. National Labor Relations Board, 535 U.S. 137 (2002), was a 2002 decision of the Supreme Court of the United States, which denied an award of back pay to an undocumented worker, Jose Castro, who had been laid off for participating in a union organizing campaign at Hoffman Plastics Compounds plant along with several other employees.

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) found that the layoff of Castro violated National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) section 8(a) (3) on the unlawful firing of union supporters. Castro has entered the United States illegally and has also used another person's identity (a friend's birth certificate) to gain employment at Hoffman Plastics.

In a 5-4 decision with the justices divided along ideological lines, the Supreme Court interpreted the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA), which penalizes the acts of undocumented workers and provides for significant penalties to companies that knowingly employ illegal immigrants, to disallow the use of the punitive provisions of the NLRA against an employer which would benefit any person who knowingly broke immigration law. 
 

Gannett Blog: USAT | Shrinking staff -- and stories, too

Gannett Blog: USAT | Shrinking staff -- and stories, too: "It's not intended to lessen our focus or priorities on long-form, enterprise journalism." -- David Callaway , in an adden...

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Help Restore the Oldest Newspaper Press in Britain



The oldest newspaper press in Britain

The Scottish Printing Archival Trust is launching a campaign to preserve and restore a unique, 105-year-old newspaper printing machine. The Cossar, a 10-ton reel-fed flatbed newspaper printing press, is thought to be the only one of its kind left in the world. It was built into the premises of David Philips Printers, Crieff, under the supervision of its Scottish designer, Tom Cossar, in 1907.

Tom Cossar's invention, a development of the widely used 'Wharfedale' press, revolutionised the production of small circulation local papers. The flatbed cylinder press utilised the skills and equipment generally available in small printing shops, whilst the web-fed configuration allowed in-line production (from reel to folded copy in one pass) thus enabling low cost and  rapid publication.

This press ran complete editions of the 'Strathearn Herald' every single week from its original installation until 28 March 1991, when the title was transferred to Scottish and Universal Newspapers.

David Philips in Crieff has generously donated this magnificent example of early 20th century printing engineering and media history to the National Museum of Scotland, which put forward funding to move the press from Crieff to storage in Clydeside. It had to be removed as it was installed – in pieces and therefore there is a funding shortfall of approximately £15,000 needed to ensure its re-instatement and restoration to full working order. The Scottish Printing Archival Trust is spearheading the fundraising effort to raise this sum. All donations of whatever size would be welcome.

 Help Restore the Oldest Newspaper Press in Britain

USA Today announces 'two big changes'

USA Today announces 'two big changes'

Tuesday Afternoon in the Blogosphere


Newspapers just another special interest - News Zap

Miami Herald Bids Biscayne Bay Adieu - The Street

Internet Killed the Newspaper Star - The Motley Fool

Reuters – All the Newspapers Fit to be Sold - PE Hub

This is the future of newspapers - Portage Daily Graphic

Circulation and readership up at some alt weeklies - Poynter

More college newspapers go digital first - The Cavalier Daily

New York Times Company in a mad rush for the exits - Insider Monkey

Digital migration prompts redundancies at British newspapers - Editors Weblog

Story behind our Twitter and Facebook campaign - Pacific Media Workers Guild

Today in Labor History

March 26  --  SOURCE: Union Communications Services, Inc.

San Francisco brewery workers begin a 9-month strike as local employers follow the union-busting lead of the National Brewer’s Association. and fire their unionized workers, replacing them with scabs. Two unionized brewers refused to go along, kept producing beer, prospered wildly and induced the Association to capitulate. A contract benefit since having unionized two years earlier, certainly worth defending: free beer - 1868


Working Class Hero -- via -- www.unionist.com

San Francisco brewery workers begin a 9-month strike as local employers follow the union-busting lead of the National Brewer’s Association. and fire their unionized workers, replacing them with scabs. Two unionized brewers refused to go along, kept producing beer, prospered wildly and induced the Association to capitulate. A contract benefit since having unionized two years earlier, certainly worth defending: free beer - 1888

JUNE 1886: Brewery workers union formed among mostly socialist German workers, to resist the prevailing 16-18 hour workday. On July 22, 1886 breweries admitted defeat and gave in to union demands for FREE BEER, the closed shop, freedom to live anywhere for brewery workers (who had up until then typically lived in the brewery itself), a 10-hour day, six-day week, and a board of arbitration.

MARCH 26, 1888: Having broken the union everywhere except San Francisco during the previous two years, the National Brewer's Association issued a manifesto against unionism. The national organization ordered its affiliated San Francisco members to fire union workers and replace them with scabs, which led to a 9 month strike. During the strike, two union breweries, the Fredericksburg of San Jose and another in Sacramento, were prospering wildly, which helped the San Francisco boycott to hold and induced the Brewers' Association to capitulate on June 5, 1889.

The great success of the strike led to many others by the militant young union that would eventually be called the International Union of United Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers of America (BFCSD). The BFCSD even used their abilities to assist workers to organize in other sectors. They successfully organized the Retail Clerks International Protective Association in 1890, and the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America in 1897.
 

The Little Book of Big Savings


Monday, March 25, 2013

San Francisco Peninsula Press Club: Daily News to print 3 days a week

San Francisco Peninsula Press Club: Daily News to print 3 days a week

Iconic History making Photo/Journalist Haywood Galbreath



  • Coming April 14, 2013 to The African American Museum of Art in the Crenshaw district of Los Angeles on the third floor of Macy’s in the Crenshaw Mall the history making images and stories behind moments captured through the lens of one of America’s most history making photojournalist goes on display.  Be in attendance from 2 to 4 PM as iconic history making photojournalist Haywood Galbreath tells and shows images from a storied career that was God ordained and a path to photojournalism excellence and history that was made by God!

I have accomplished what I have accomplished in my career because of my faith in God and the belief that he would permit my dreams to become a reality if I called on him and believed in him!  I will not for men and the acceptance of society deny him now or ever!

- Iconic History making Photo/Journalist Haywood Galbreath-
     
    Coming April 14, 2013 to The African American Museum of Art in the Crenshaw district of Los Angeles on the third floor of Macy’s in the Crenshaw Mall the history making images and stories behind moments captured through the lens of one of America’s most history making photojournalist goes on display. Be in attendance from 2 to 4 PM as iconic history making photojournalist Haywood Galbreath tells and shows images from a storied career that was God ordained and a path to photojournalism excellence and history that was made by God!

    I have accomplished what I have accomplished in my career because of my faith in God and the belief that he would permit my dreams to become a reality if I called on him and believed in him! I will not for men and the acceptance of society deny him now or ever!

    - Iconic History making Photo/Journalist Haywood Galbreath-

Gannett Blog: Gannett to deliver Bloomberg Businessweek

Gannett Blog: Gannett to deliver Bloomberg Businessweek: Gannett will deliver the weekly magazine to 100,000 subscribers in 15 U.S. markets, taking over a service that had been provided by the U....

Friends of The San Francisco Chronicle Guild

We, the employees of the San Francisco Chronicle, have had enough.




We love this newspaper, and we've worked hard since the layoffs of 2009 to help keep it afloat. We've done everything Hearst demanded: sacrificing pay raises, giving up seniority, losing vacation time and holidays, even working through what used to be our paid lunch hour.

For years, we've been working twice as hard with a smaller staff — doing everything needed to keep this paper afloat, relevant and great.

And this is how the highly profitable Hearst Corporation pays us back.

Now, Hearst is insisting that we shoulder huge increases for an inferior health plan. Even offset by a meager proposed raise, this accounts to a pay cut of hundreds or thousands of dollars a years for most of us.

We love the Chronicle, and we love journalism, but we can't keep donating our own livelihoods to increase the profits of our corporate owners.

Help us tell Hearst that San Francisco deserves better.

Here's how you can help:

* Tweet your support: http://clicktotweet.com/O0va1
* Like this page, and post a message of support
* Sign our petition: http://www.thepetitionsite.com/708/806/619/demand-fair-health-care-for-san-francisco-chronicle-workers/

Monday Afternoon in the Blogosphere

One of the many beautiful creatures at the Los Angeles Zoo

Washington Examiner ending daily print - News and Tech

Advertisers slash $476 million from newspapers - Ad News

Pew Report Sees a Glass Half Empty - Newspaper Death Watch

Boycott urged of Journal Register newspapers - Detroit Free Press

What does the future hold for The Boston Globe? - Editors Weblog

F.C.C. Shift May Thwart a Murdoch LA Times Deal - New York Times

NABET-CWA/ABC-Disney Negotiations Update - Broadcast Union News

San Francisco Chronicle Staffers Staging Social Media Protest - Fishbowl LA

San Francisco Chronicle launches paywalled site with premium content - Poynter

Newspaper industry embraces potential ownership shakeup - The Globe and Mail


Today in Labor History

March 25  --  SOURCE: Union Communications Services, Inc.

Toronto printers strike for the 9-hour day in what is believed to be Canada’s first major strike - 1872

First “Poor People’s March” on Washington, in which jobless workers demanded creation of a public works program. Led by populist Jacob Coxey, the 500 to 1,000 unemployed protesters became known as “Coxey’s Army” - 1894

A total of 146 workers are killed in a fire at New York’s Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, a disaster that would launch a national movement for safer working conditions - 19112013.03.25history-library

(Kids Library: Mother Jones, Triangle Fire, Cesar Chavez: We’ve collected this special set of attractive and kid-friendly books to help today’s youngsters understand the historic struggle of working people for justice and dignity. Each book explains an historic figure or history-altering incident in easy-to-understand language. All are generously illustrated to hold a young person’s attention.)

An explosion at a coal mine in Centralia, Ill., kills 111 miners. Mineworkers President John L. Lewis calls a 6-day work stoppage by the nation’s 400,000 soft coal miners to demand safer working conditions - 1947


Working Class Heroes -- via -- www.unionist.com

First “Poor People’s March” on Washington, in which jobless workers demanded creation of a public works program. Led by populist Jacob Coxey, the 500 to 1,000 unemployed protesters became known as “Coxey’s Army” - 1894 ~De

In 1894, Jacob S. Coxey, an owner of a sand quarry in Massillon, Ohio, faced difficult financial times as the Panic of 1893 gripped the United States. In protest of the federal government's failure to assist the American populace during this economic downturn, Coxey formed a protest march that became known as "Coxey's Army." The group left Massillon, numbering one hundred men, on Easter Sunday, with the intention of marching to Washington, DC, to demand that the United States government assist the American worker. As the group marched to Washington, hundreds more workers joined it along the route. Coxey claimed that his army would eventually number more than 100,000 men. By the time that the army reached Washington, it numbered only five hundred men.

Upon arriving in Washington, Coxey and his supporters demanded that the federal government immediately assist workers by hiring them to work on public projects such as roads and government buildings. The United States Congress and President Grover Cleveland refused. Law enforcement officials arrested Coxey for trespassing on public property. Coxey's Army quickly dispersed upon its leader's arrest.

"Coxey's Army" illustrates the harsh financial situation gripping the United States during the Panic of 1893. It also shows a growing desire among Americans for their government to play a more active role in solving the people's problems.
 

Nikon D3100 14.2MP Digital SLR Camera


Friday, March 22, 2013

Good Grief: Who’s Going to Cover LA Now? April 27

RSVP HERE

SCHEDULE HERE

 LA Progressive

Bloomberg Businessweek expands non-postal delivery

Bloomberg Businessweek expands non-postal delivery

Gannett Blog: Urgent: Martore got $3M in stock, $1.6M bonus in 2012

Gannett Blog: Urgent: Martore got $3M in stock, $1.6M bonus in 2...: The figures for CEO Gracia Martore and Gannett's other highest-paid executives last year were disclosed moments ago in the annual shar...

Older Los Angeles Times Photos

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Photographs of the men and women that once produced the mighty Los Angeles Times newspaper.

WIN a Shelby COBRA

Hollywood stuntman Sammy Maloof and Vietnam Veteran of the year, Bob Wieland are GIVING AWAY a BEAUTIFUL 1966 ERA Shelby Cobra with an enclosed 20 foot trailer with generator. Why? To do more of this: http://bit.ly/pCyJfo How would YOU like to WIN a beautiful car while helping those in desperate need? Here's how: 1. Click here: http://WinAShelbyCobraCar.com/ 2. Donate $20 or more 3. Tell EVERYONE you know to do the same, so we can continue to help more. THATS IT! YOU'RE IN!!! If you are a business, school, corporation or church & you would like bulk tickets, please email us at winashelbycobra@yahoo.com ASAP. THANKU for helping us make a difference!
Hollywood stuntman Sammy Maloof and Vietnam Veteran of the year, Bob Wieland are GIVING AWAY a BEAUTIFUL 1966 ERA Shelby Cobra with an enclosed 20 foot trailer with generator. Why? To do more of this: http://bit.ly/pCyJfo How would YOU like to WIN a beautiful car while helping those in desperate need? Here's how: 1. Click here: http://WinAShelbyCobraCar.com/ 2. Donate $20 or more 3. Tell EVERYONE you know to do the same, so we can continue to help more. THATS IT! YOU'RE IN!!! If you are a business, school, corporation or church & you would like bulk tickets, please email us at winashelbycobra@yahoo.com ASAP. THANKU for helping us make a difference!

Two Digital Cameras Needed for Photography Class


MPJI update :

Group photo of my students from Inglewood High School we took the group photo this afternoon after a video session for the MPJI website. I have six very nice and intelligent students and we are preparing for some field trips to captured images and moments for their upcoming photo exhibit in April which will debut April 28 in the same venue as my photo exhibit. The Museum of African American art 4005 Crenshaw Blvd third floor of Macy’s. My photo exhibit will feature 24 years of my photo journalism and other photography work in Los Angeles and throughout the country.

It promises to be one spectacular show/exhibit there will be a section dedicated to my history making coverage of “the trial of the century”. I have many untold stories from that historical trial and over 18,000 images most of which have never been published but many will be in my book celebrating the 20 year anniversary of the historical trial in 2014. Tentative title of the book O.J. the untold story of the trial of the century through the eyes and lens of the Black Press of America.

-Iconic history making Photo/ Journalist Haywood Galbreath-

The students are in need of two digital cameras, new or used, won't you consider making a donation of the needed equipment?As you probably already know by now I'm most attracted to men and women that give without requiring something in return, Mr. Galbreath is this type of person. Contact either of us via Facebook or visit his website by clicking here. Thank you, Edward

Friday Morning in the Blogosphere


Graphic has weathered many storms - Daily Graphic

Pope calls to cancel newspaper himself - Oakland Press

Fox KTTV Veep: “Unions = Criminals” - Frying Pan News

Newspaper kills comic about depressing newspaper - Examiner

A bad morning for Washington Post e-mail to be down - Romenesko

Boston Phoenix Falls, Smaller Alt-Weeklies Survive - Huffington Post

‘Let Me Tweet That For You’ site raises concerns for journalists - Poynter

Can Newspapers Evolve Into ‘Local Membership’ Organizations? - Street Fight

Los Angeles Times Can Help LA’s Police Department Save Money - Dan Bluemel

Newspaper announces plan to move printing to Springfield - Republican American

Today in Labor History

March 22 - SOURCE: Union Communications Services, Inc.2013.03.18history-mark-twain

Mark Twain, a lifelong member of the Int’l Typographical Union (now part of CWA), speaks in Hartford, Conn., extolling the Knights of Labor’s commitment to fair treatment of all workers, regardless of race or gender - 1886

The Grand Coulee Dam on Washington state’s Columbia River begins operation after a decade of construction. Eight thousand workers labored on the project; 77 died - 1941

Eight hundred striking workers at Brown & Sharpe in Kingstown, R.I. are tear-gassed by state and local police in what was to become a losing 17-year-long fight by the Machinists union - 1982

A 32-day lockout of major league baseball players ends with an agreement to raise the minimum league salary from $68,000 to $100,000 and to study revenue-sharing between owners and players - 1990

A bitter six-and-a-half-year UAW strike at Caterpillar Inc. ends. The strike and settlement, which included a two-tier wage system and other concessions, deeply divided the union - 1998

 Working Class Heroes -- via -- www.unionist.com

The Grand Coulee Dam on Washington state’s Columbia River begins operation after a decade of construction. Eight thousand workers labored on the project; 77 died - 1941 ~De

Workers building the dam received an average of 80¢ an hour; the payroll for the dam was among the largest in the nation. The workers were mainly pulled from Grant, Lincoln, Douglas, and Okanogan counties and women were allowed to work only in the dorms and the cookhouse. Around 8,000 people worked on the project, and Frank A. Banks served as the chief construction engineer. Bert A. Hall was the chief inspector who would accept the dam from the contractors. Orin G. Patch served as the chief of concrete. Construction conditions were dangerous and 77 workers died.

To prepare for construction, housing for workers was needed along with four bridges downstream of the dam site, one of which, the Grand Coulee Bridge, exists today. The Bureau of Reclamation provided housing and located their administrative building at Engineer's Town, which was located directly downstream of the construction site on the west side of the river. Opposite Engineer's Town, MWAK constructed Mason City in 1934. Mason city contained a hospital, post office, electricity and other amenities along with a population of 3,000. Three-bedroom houses in the city were rented for $32 a month. Of the two living areas, Engineer's City was considered to have the better housing. Several other living areas formed around the construction site in an area known as Shack Town, which did not have reliable access to electricity and the same amenities as the other towns. 

Incorporated in 1935, the city of Grand Coulee supported workers as well and is located just west of the dam on the plateau. MWAK eventually sold Mason City to Reclamation in 1937 before its contract was completed. In 1956, Reclamation combined both Mason City and Engineer's Town to form the city of Coulee Dam. It was incorporated as a city in February 1959.

Toshiba Satellite L875D-S7332 Notebook Laptop

Thursday, March 21, 2013

Thursday Afternoon in the Blogosphere

Eric Garcetti for Mayor of Los Angeles 2013



Daily Variety retires after 80 years - Editors Weblog

Shreveport | Pub said out after just 14 months - Gannett Blog

In response to the response 'Why I left news' - Sticky Valentines

Are Newspapers and Books Really Going Extinct? - Policy Mic

New Printing Press Issues causes delivery problems - Times Union

Chicago Tribune last, NPR first in test of news websites’ speed - Poynter

The Citizen to cease Monday Publication of their newspaper - Auburn Pub

Today: Miami Herald headquarters; Tomorrow: More condos - Romenesko

What does Fairfax’s adoption of a “soft” paywall mean for newspapers - LC

Best way to learn about Los Angeles is to read New York Times - Brady Westwater

Steve Soboroff Endorses Eric Garcetti for Mayor

Steve is simply one of the most respected leaders in Los Angeles, and I know he will make a big difference in my campaign. I'm honored to have earned his endorsement. http://www.ericgarcetti.com/steve_soboroff_endorses_eric_garcetti_for_mayor

Wendy Greuel's 'throw all the spaghetti against the wall' campaign - LA Biz Observed

Wendy Greuel's 'throw all the spaghetti against the wall' campaign - LA Biz Observed