Monday, September 30, 2013

Government Shutdown in 18 minutes - Should we be scared?


Why a government 'shutdown' is more like a 'slowdown' - LA Biz Observed

Why a government 'shutdown' is more like a 'slowdown' - LA Biz Observed

Sammy Maloof at Dunamis Power Ministries Mens Breakfast




Today in Labor History


A total of 29 strike leaders are charged with treason—plotting "to incite insurrection, rebellion & war against the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania"—for daring to strike the Carnegie Steel Co. in Homestead, Pa. Jurors refuse to convict them - 1892

2013.09.30history-majones
Seventy-year-old Mother Jones organizes the wives of striking miners in Arnot, Pa., to descend on the mine with brooms, mops and clanging pots and pans. They frighten away the mules and their scab drivers. The miners eventually won their strike - 1899

(The Autobiography of Mother Jones: Mary Harris Jones—“Mother Jones”—was the most dynamic woman ever to grace the American labor movement. Employers and politicians around the turn of the century called her “the most dangerous woman in America” and rebellious working men and women loved her as they never loved anyone else.)

Railroad shopmen in 28 cities strike the Illinois Central Railroad and the Harriman lines for an 8-hour day, improved conditions and union recognition, but railroad officials obtain sweeping injunctions against them and rely on police and armed guards to protect strikebreakers - 1915

Black farmers meet in Elaine, Ark., to establish the Progressive Farmers and Householders Union to fight for better pay and higher cotton prices. They are shot at by a group of whites, and return the fire. News of the confrontation spread and a riot ensued, leaving at least 100, perhaps several hundred, blacks dead and 67 indicted for inciting violence - 1919

Cesar Chavez, with Delores Huerta, co-founds the National Farm Workers Association, which later was to become the United Farm Workers of America - 1962

Sunday, September 29, 2013

Saturday, September 28, 2013

Teamster Nation: Workers still really, really want unions

Teamster Nation: Workers still really, really want unions: Many American workers are treated badly on the job, as we have pointed out in our never-ending series of posts about their desire to join o...

Five Things You Might Have Missed on 'Poverty Day' | The Poverty Line, What Matters Today | BillMoyers.com

Five Things You Might Have Missed on 'Poverty Day' | The Poverty Line, What Matters Today | BillMoyers.com

Dr. Phil Test

Gannett Blog: In new med plan, a worker named Maria suffers; lit...

Gannett Blog: In new med plan, a worker named Maria suffers; lit...: As employees dig deeper into Gannett's new health insurance plan, it's become painfully clear the sweeping changes will have devast...

Today in Labor History

September 28  --  Union Communications Services, Inc.
 2013.09.23history-workingmens-assocThe International Workingmen’s Association is founded in London.  It was an international organization trying to unite a variety of different left-wing, socialist, communist and anarchist political groups and unions.  It functioned for about 12 years, growing to a membership declared to be eight million, before being disbanded at its Philadelphia conference in 1876, victim of infight

Friday, September 27, 2013

Meet 2013 Mr. America, Christian Motivational Speaker, John Heart

Against all odds, husband, father, personal trainer, speaker and most importantly-- man of FAITH, John Heart won the light heavy weight title in 2012. Then in 2013 he trained the entire year to go back for ONLY ONE ACCEPTABLE OUTCOME-- WINNING the Light Heavyweight class AGAIN and the OVERALL Mr. America Title. Remember, FAILURE is an opinion NOT an event. It's NEVER too late for your hearts desires to come to pass! Watch this video and be inspired by a man who wouldn't quit no matter what "they said" the odds are! Invite Mr. America 2013, John Heart to SUPERCHARGE your church, corporation, civic, academic or faith-based event and help someone WIN at the Race of Life. Visit www.IntenseHeart.com or call (626) 292-2258 to book.

Friday Night in the Blogosphere

Los Angeles Times Press Crew about 1985


People pay for entertainment, not news - Paid Content

Tribune aims to cut publishing costs by 5 percent - Crain's

New med plan is 'a pay cut, plain and simple' - Gannett Blog

Tribune blasts report about newspaper budget cuts - Romenesko

Tribune likely to cut newspaper staff: report - Chicago Sun-Times

Fourteen Condé Nast Traveler employees were laid off yesterday - Capital NY

New sites show how digital media is helping drive innovation - Editors Weblog

Sun and the Sunday Mirror suffer sales drops after cover price hikes - Guardian

Hal Varian: the economics of the newspaper business - International Journalism

GateHouse Media Inc. files prepackaged Chapter 11 bankruptcy - Patriot Ledger

Americans can be pretty clueless about the deficit - LA Biz Observed

Americans can be pretty clueless about the deficit - LA Biz Observed

PATH - Making it Home

PATH will help 1,100 Veterans move into permanent housing this year. But many won't have the resources to buy basic furniture and supplies. Donate to help a Vet make it home, and the Steve and Rita Emerson Veterans Fund will match contributions up to $25,000.

http://www.epath.org/donate


The Pavement Perspective: US filmmaker Rotimi Rainwater leads way with SUGAR...

The Pavement Perspective: US filmmaker Rotimi Rainwater leads way with SUGAR...: The SUGAR Film Project aims to 'make life a little sweeter for homeless youth'. The drama stars Shenae Grimes, of 90210 fame, and d...

Gannett Blog: Here's the red carpet medical care top execs get

Gannett Blog: Here's the red carpet medical care top execs get: At Gannett, VIP stands for very important perquisites. As Gannett ratchets up the cost of health insurance for regular workers, it pay...

Top Five Things I Didn't Learn in J-School

Self-catering is the first lesson in Stephanie Tsoflias' Mediabistro video about the "Top Five Things I Didn't Learn in J-School."

"You're going to be the only person over 30 to pack a brown-bag lunch," she says. "That's because it's the only balanced meal you'll get that day, and plus you don't want to spend every penny you're making."

Yet another newspaper carrier saves person from fire

Yet another newspaper carrier saves person from fire

Today in Labor History


Striking textile workers in Fall River, Mass., demand bread for their starving children - 1875

The Int’l Typographical Union renews a strike against the Los Angeles Times and begins a boycott that runs intermittently from 1896 to 1908. A local anti-Times committee in 1903 persuades William Randolph Hearst to start a rival paper, the Los Angeles Examiner. Although the ITU kept up the fight into the 1920s, the Times remained totally nonunion until 2009, when the GCIU—now the Graphic Communications Conference of the Teamsters—organized the pressroom - 1893

Int’l Ladies' Garment Workers Union begins strike against Triangle Shirtwaist Co. This would become the "Uprising of the 20,000," 2013.09.23history-triangleresulting in 339 of 352 struck firms—but not Triangle—signing agreements with the union. The Triangle fire that killed 246 would occur less than two years later - 1909

(Triangle: The Fire that Changed America: On March 25, 1911, a fire broke out at the Triangle shirtwaist factory in New York City. Within minutes it engulfed three upper floors, burning to death—or causing to jump to their deaths—146 workers, 123 of them women, some as young as 15. The garment factory was a sweatshop, employing mostly young Italian and Jewish immigrants, and was typical of thousands of other such hellholes throughout the city, complete with locked exit doors and useless fire escapes. It was the worst workplace disaster in the city’s history and ultimately led to the beginnings of workplace safety and health laws—and an increased understanding that the presence of unions could help prevent more such tragedies.)

Twenty-nine west coast ports lock out 10,500 workers in response to what management says is a worker slowdown in the midst of negotiations on a new contract. The ports are closed for 10 days, reopen when President George W. Bush invokes the Taft-Hartley Act - 2002

Thursday, September 26, 2013

This video will CHANGE your life


Thursday Night in the Blogosphere



Tribune boss orders $100 million in cuts - Robert Feder

USA Today president: ‘No plan exists’ for paywall - Poynter

The world's oldest newspaper goes digital only - Courier Mail

New Insights On Newspapers' Mobile Audience - Net News Check

Jeff Bezos is both right and wrong about newspapers - Paid Content

August was a wild month in the world of newspapers - Toni McQuilken

Newspaper Carrier Finishes Route in Floodwaters - Editor and Publisher

Tweet This - Why paywalls are failing the news industry - Catholic Online

Free Kindles for Washington Post subscribers coming soon? - Romenesko

The Star-Ledger reaches deal with 4 unions, avoids shutdown - Star-Ledger



Gannett Blog: You may pay more of your real med costs in 2014; e...

Gannett Blog: You may pay more of your real med costs in 2014; e...: Gannett's newest campaign to rein in health care costs stems partly from something thousands of employees and retirees don't fully ...

Health Care law 101: Figuring out who gets covered - LA Biz Observed

Health Care law 101: Figuring out who gets covered - LA Biz Observed

Today in Labor History


Striking textile workers in Fall River, Mass., demand bread for their starving children - 1875

The Int’l Typographical Union renews a strike against the Los Angeles Times and begins a boycott that runs intermittently from 1896 to 1908. A local anti-Times committee in 1903 persuades William Randolph Hearst to start a rival paper, the Los Angeles Examiner. Although the ITU kept up the fight into the 1920s, the Times remained totally nonunion until 2009, when the GCIU—now the Graphic Communications Conference of the Teamsters—organized the pressroom - 1893

Int’l Ladies' Garment Workers Union begins strike against Triangle Shirtwaist Co. This would become the "Uprising of the 20,000," 2013.09.23history-triangleresulting in 339 of 352 struck firms—but not Triangle—signing agreements with the union. The Triangle fire that killed 246 would occur less than two years later - 1909

(Triangle: The Fire that Changed America: On March 25, 1911, a fire broke out at the Triangle shirtwaist factory in New York City. Within minutes it engulfed three upper floors, burning to death—or causing to jump to their deaths—146 workers, 123 of them women, some as young as 15. The garment factory was a sweatshop, employing mostly young Italian and Jewish immigrants, and was typical of thousands of other such hellholes throughout the city, complete with locked exit doors and useless fire escapes. It was the worst workplace disaster in the city’s history and ultimately led to the beginnings of workplace safety and health laws—and an increased understanding that the presence of unions could help prevent more such tragedies.)

Twenty-nine west coast ports lock out 10,500 workers in response to what management says is a worker slowdown in the midst of negotiations on a new contract. The ports are closed for 10 days, reopen when President George W. Bush invokes the Taft-Hartley Act - 2002

Police arrest comedian who allegedly punched journalist

Police arrest comedian who allegedly punched journalist

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Pinterest sees growing number of journalists using the site, makes related changes

Pinterest sees growing number of journalists using the site, makes related changes

Jeff Bezos talks about future of printed newspaper

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Wednesday Night in the Blogosphere

Completed newspapers flowing from the printing press


Conrad Black says newspapers can be revived - CBC

GCI's shares hit two 52-week high today - Gannett Blog

More offline adults says the Internet is too hard to use - Poynter

Why the TV industry won’t go the way of newspapers - Gigaom

GOP’s Defunding Mania: Instant Constitutional Crisis - Robert Reich

Smile, Dow Jones employees, you’re on coffee bar camera - Romenesko

Two longtime area newspapers have a new look today - Brainerd Dispatch

MailOnline ad revenues offset falls at chain’s newspapers - Financial Times

‘Obamacare’ causing trouble for newspapers that endorsed the law - The Blaze

Judge rejects effort to end newspaper operating agreement - Las Vegas Review-Journal

Federal court allows liquor ads in college newspapers

Federal court allows liquor ads in college newspapers

Governor Brown Signs Historic Minimum Wage Increase into Law

Governor Brown Signs Historic Minimum Wage Increase into Law

Printing - 1947 - Printing Press Work and Use

How a printing press was run in the olden days. Work for MEN. Still, a long way from when Johannes Gutenberg invented the printing press in 1445.

Los Angeles Times Editor Davan Maharaj memo to Staff

Davan Maharaj 
Editor and Executive Vice President,
Los Angeles Times


Comrades:

Each year, the Emmy Awards give us a chance to showcase our skill at covering a major awards event using our expanding set of journalistic tools -- breaking news alerts, quirky asides, sharp analysis, engaging videos, colorful photo galleries, Twitter feeds and more.

This year’s coverage was exceptionally successful. The journalism was outstanding, and it found a wide audience. Emmys traffic on Sunday and Monday was up 29% over last year. On Monday, Calendar’s Emmy-fueled Showtracker blog set a one-day record.

In print, the Calendar team produced an A-1 story and six robust pages of stories and photos.

There are many people to thank for this great work, starting with our TV team led by Martin Miller, the architect of the coverage. At the Nokia Theater, Yvonne Villarreal, Nardine Saad, Jessica Gelt and Amy Kaufman worked the scene from the red carpet to the press tent. In the newsroom and other locations, Glenn Whipp, Susan King, Rene Lynch, Patrick Day, Greg Braxton, Meredith Blake, Steve Zeitchik, Scott Collins, Booth Moore, Mary McNamara and Robert Lloyd provided smart stories and commentary.

On the Company Town team, Meg James, Joe Flint and Dawn Chmielewski contributed an insightful follow-up story and party coverage.

Stacey Leasca, Amy Hubbard, and Tenny Tatusian live-blogged the event, and Stacey moderated a post-Emmys webcast with Mary McNamara and Glenn Whipp.

All that work went through an editing team of Laurie Ochoa, Rich Nordwind, Elena Howe, Alice Short, Sherry Stern, Lee Margulies and Martin Miller.

Photographers, photo editors and a videographer captured the crucial visual side of the spectacle. Organized by Cindy Hively, the contributors were Robert Gauthier, Al Seib, Larry Ho, Jay Clendenin, Al Schaben, Christina House, Ken Kwok, Hal Wells, Kirk McKoy, David Muronaka, Jason Neubert, Calvin Hom, Jerome Adamstein, Kathy Pyon and Don Kelsen.

The copy-editing team led by Loree Matsui straightened out the kinks. With Judy Cramer as lead slot, the copy desk for the big night was Steve Elders, Bobbi Olson, Ruthanne Salido, Alison Dingeldein, Mark Geers, Blake Hennon, Marina Levario, Daryl Miller and Mark Sachs.

Our print readers were treated to one handsome page after another thanks to Steve Hawkins’ design group. Judy Pryor was the lead designer, joined by An Moonen, Jan Molen and Clare Jensen.

Through it all, our web team led by Scott Sandell made the online presentation sparkle. Jevon Phillips, Noelene Clark, Lily Mihalik, Andrea Wang and Christy Khoshaba from the entertainment group kicked it into high gear, assisted by Dianne DeGuzman, Jason La, Kari Beal and Tracy Brown from Features.

On the home page, Soo Oh, Mark McGonigle and Dave Johnson gave the event the play it deserved.

Thanks to all for an inspired performance.

Davan
 
SOURCE: Brett Levy

Obama's biggest mistake in pushing health care law - LA Biz Observed

Obama's biggest mistake in pushing health care law - LA Biz Observed

Today in Labor History


American photographer Lewis Hine born in Oshkosh, Wisc. - 18742013.09.23history-kids-at-work

(Kids at Work: Lewis Hine and the Crusade Against Child Labor: Your heart will be broken by this exceptional book’s photographs of children at backbreaking, often life-threatening work, and the accompanying commentary by author Russell Freedman. Photographer Lewis Hine – who himself died in poverty in 1940 – did as much, and perhaps more, than any social critic in the early part of the 20th century to expose the abuse of children, as young as three and four, by American capitalism.)

 Two African-American sharecroppers are killed during an ultimately unsuccessful cotton-pickers strike in Lee County, Ark. By the time the strike had been suppressed, 15 African-Americans had died and another six had been imprisoned. A white plantation manager was killed as well - 1891 ~De
The Cotton Pickers Strike of 1891 was an ill-conceived attempt by a group of African-American sharecroppers in Lee County, perhaps loosely affiliated with the Colored Farmers’ National Alliance and Union (commonly called the Colored Famers’ Alliance), to increase the wages they received from local planters for picking cotton. By the time a white mob put down the strike, more than a dozen African Americans and one white man had been killed.

The Colored Farmers’ Alliance was founded in Texas in 1886 as the black counterpart to the Farmers’ Alliance, an all-white organization that was part of the late nineteenth-century populist, agrarian reform movement. The Colored Farmers’ Alliance spread quickly throughout the South, claiming a membership of more than one million just four years after its founding. In 1891, alliance founder and spokesman R. M. Humphrey, a white man, hatched a plan to organize a national strike of black cotton pickers in order to raise their wages. At the time, many white landowners conspired with each other to keep wages miserably low for their black workers, and local law enforcement often rounded up African Americans on vagrancy charges and forced them to work off their fines on select plantations, a practice known as peonage. Humphrey was convinced that direct action needed to be taken to combat these crimes, but many in the alliance disagreed, citing the inability of the organization to provide any protection for striking farmers. The proposed national strike date of September 12 came and went with only a handful of cotton pickers in eastern Texas withholding their labor.

Just over a week later, however, cotton pickers in Lee County, organized by Ben Patterson of Memphis, Tennessee, went on strike after word spread that J. F. Frank, a Memphian visiting land he owned in the area, had stated that, if need be, he would pay one dollar per hundred pounds rather than the going rate of fifty cents. On September 20, cotton pickers working for Colonel H. P. Rodgers demanded an increase in their wages. Strike leaders subsequently traveled throughout the county urging others to join the movement, though with little success. In fact, conflict between strikers and non-strikers resulted in two cotton pickers being killed on September 25. In response, the county sheriff organized a posse to seek out Patterson and his followers. The situation was made worse for the strikers on September 28 after two of them killed Frank’s plantation manager, Tom Miller; another group burned down a cotton gin.

By September 29, the strikers were on the run, many of them having fled to Cat Island, located on the Mississippi River east of Horseshoe Lake (Crittenden County). The white posse stormed the island, killing two strikers and capturing nine; those captured were later seized by masked men as they were being transported to Marianna (Lee County) and subsequently hanged. Patterson managed to board a steamboat, but he, too, was killed once the crew learned his identity. By the time the mob finished suppressing the strike, it had killed fifteen African Americans and imprisoned another six.
http://www.encyclopediaofarkansas.net/encyclopedia/entry-detail.aspx?entryID=4267

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Tuesday Night in the Blogosphere





The Homeless of L.A. - Behance

Protecting journalism v journalists - Jeff Jarvis

Popular Science pulls the plug on comments - Romenesko

Conrad Black: The newspapers strike back - National Post

Belo said to have 70% shareholder support for deal - Gannett Blog

In Sickness and In Health: Defending Obamacare - Frying Pan News

No new TV viewers or newspaper subscribers are being born - Poynter

USA Today Publisher – Newspapers Must Be Conversation-Starters - The Wrap

Washington Post launches Topicly, a new visual news platform - Editors Weblog

Newspapers still enjoyable; don't forget to thank local journalists - Aurora Advocate

Former Tribune Co. executive sentenced to 2 years

Former Tribune Co. executive sentenced to 2 years

Let's Get Ready For Obamacare



Thanks to Obamacare, millions of families receive free or low-cost healthcare—and SEIU-UHW is taking the lead to make sure everyone who is eligible gets covered.

If you or someone you know needs healthcare coverage, just complete the form to the right and an enrollment specialist will help you get covered. If you live in LA County, you can also call our enrollment hotline at 323-888-8113.

Want to take action to help uninsured Californians get healthcare? Just fill out the form to find out how you can help bring Obamacare to all of California!

10 Reasons to Support a $10 Minimum Wage

10 Reasons to Support a $10 Minimum Wage

Gannett Blog: Here is an FAQ explaining medical plan changes

Gannett Blog: Here is an FAQ explaining medical plan changes: The document in .pdf format was apparently issued today with information about changes coming to Gannett's employee medical coverage...
 Question: How does a participant pay for a medical expense? Explain the process.

Answer: It apparently involves four steps, as follows.

  • A participant has a health event, visits a pharmacy, or doctor for treatment.
  • The participant is responsible for the full cost of his or her health care expenses until the deductible is met. The participant can choose to pay for the medical expense with available funds from their HSA or pay another way and let the HSA grow.
  • Once the deductible is met, the plan coverage begins and the participant and the plan pay co-insurance.
  • The participant is protected with an out-of-pocket limit. After that limit is reached, the plan pays 100% of covered expenses.
Clearly in this case, the dollar amount of your annual deductible is key to understanding your new effective annual medical costs.

Today in Labor History


Canada declares the Wobblies illegal - 1918 ~De

The Industrial Workers of the World (IWW or the Wobblies) is an international industrial union that was formed in 1905. The origin of the nickname "Wobblies" is uncertain.

The IWW promotes the concept of "One Big Union", contends that all workers should be united as a social class and that capitalism and wage labor should be abolished. They are known for the Wobbly Shop model of workplace democracy, in which workers elect their managers and other forms of grassroots democracy (self-management) are implemented. IWW membership does not require that one work in a represented workplace, nor does it exclude membership in another labor union.
The IWW was active in Canada from a very early point in the organization's history, especially in Western Canada, primarily in British Columbia. The union was active in organizing large swaths of the lumber and mining industry along the coast, in the Interior of BC, and Vancouver Island. Joe Hill wrote the song "Where the Fraser River Flows" during this period when the IWW was organizing in British Columbia. Some members of the IWW had relatively close links with the Socialist Party of Canada.

Arthur "Slim" Evans, organizer in the Relief Camp Workers' Union and the On-to-Ottawa Trek was once a Wobbly, although during the On-to-Ottawa Trek he was with the One Big Union. He was also a friend of another well-known Canadian, Ginger Goodwin, who was shot in Cumberland, British Columbia by a Dominion Police constable when he was resisting the First World War. The impact of Ginger Goodwin influenced various left and progressive groups in Canada, including a progressive group of MPs in the House of Commons called the Ginger Group.

Today the IWW remains active in the country with numerous branches in Vancouver, Vancouver Island, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Ottawa, Toronto, Windsor and Montréal. The largest branch is currently in Edmonton.

Among current and more notable IWW shops in Canada is the Ottawa Panhandlers' Union, which continues a tradition in the IWW of organizing disenfranchised workers on relief or in work camps started during the Great Depression. In the spirit of organizing industrially, any who make their living in the street, such as buskers, street vendors, or panhandlers are welcome to join the Ottawa Panhandlers' Union.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_Workers_of_the_World
Listen to the song
Utah Phillips - Where the Fraser River Flows (by Joe Hill)
http://youtu.be/7Rww4Fx5NeY



#zeroLRA - Stand for nothing

Invisible Children's newest campaign - #zeroLRA. Stand for nothing. No child soldiers, no killing, and no war. Celebrate everything. Every escape, every name, and every life. Help children, women, and abducted soldiers escape from the LRA and return home. Every escape is a step closer to #zeroLRA.

Gannett Blog: Are health insurance premiums rising 20% to 50%?

Gannett Blog: Are health insurance premiums rising 20% to 50%?: I'm told employee premiums will jump 20% to 50% starting next year under the just-announced change to Gannett's medical plan for ne...

National Voter Registration Day




Today is National Voter Registration Day, follow this link to register.


Why J.K. Rowling would be a good newspaper owner

Why J.K. Rowling would be a good newspaper owner

Monday, September 23, 2013

Monday Night in the Blogosphere

 
Taken at 5th and San Julian in the heart of Skid Row Los Angeles



Former Tribune Co shareholders notch legal victory - Chicago Tribune

Mercury News selling headquarters to Super Micro - SV Business Journal

There’s one good thing about the newspaper industry decline - Paid Content

Attention world leaders! Message for Americans? Try a newspaper op-ed - NBC

White Supremacist Town Forming? North Dakota Man Plots Takeover - Newsmax

New International Standard to Reduce Print Industry's Footprint - My Print Resource

Today in Labor History

September 23  --  Union Communications Services, Inc.

2013.09.23history-working-wordsThe Workingman's Advocate of Chicago publishes the first installment of The Other Side, by Martin A. Foran, president of the Coopers' Int’l Union. Believed to be the first novel by a trade union leader and some say the first working-class novel ever published in the U.S. - 1868

(Working Words: Punching the Clock and Kicking Out the Jams: Rock stars, poets, filmmakers, activists, novelists, and historians lend their voices to this entertaining collection about the daily grind. From the folk anthems of Bob Dylan and Woody Guthrie to the poems of Walt Whitman and Amiri Baraka; from the stories of Willa Cather and Bret Lott to the rabble-rousing work of Michael Moore, and from the White Stripes’ “The Big Three Killed My Baby” to Eminem’s “Lose Yourself,” this great collection touches upon all aspects of working-class life.)

A coalition of Knights of Labor and trade unionists in Chicago launch the United Labor party, calling for an 8-hour day, government ownership of telegraph and telephone companies, and monetary and land reform. The party elects seven state assembly men and one senator - 1886

A 42-month strike by Steelworkers at Bayou Steel in Louisiana ends in a new contract and the ousting of scabs - 1996

California Gov. Gray Davis (D) signs legislation making the state the first to offer workers paid family leave - 2002

Sunday, September 22, 2013

Kid's Response Melts Drill Sergeant's Heart

And that's how you incapacitate a drill instructor without lifting a finger.

Gannett Blog: Butterfly | Why wasn't it given a better name?

Gannett Blog: Butterfly | Why wasn't it given a better name?: A distressed Anonymous@9:29 a.m. writes : "Don't they do research before they name anything? Google 'butterfly project,' a...

Mick Adams and the Stones


Show Love, Show Mercy


Fighting for Affordable Health Care in a “House of Justice”

Fighting for Affordable Health Care in a “House of Justice”

True story: Sen. John McCain calls Dodgers 'overpaid...spoiled brats' - LA Observed

True story: Sen. John McCain calls Dodgers 'overpaid...spoiled brats' - LA Observed

Today in Labor History


Emancipation Proclamation signed - 1862

Eighteen-year-old Hannah (Annie) Shapiro leads a spontaneous walkout of 17 women at a Hart Schaffner & Marx garment factory in Chicago. It grows into a months-long mass strike involving 40,000 garment workers across the city, protesting 10-hour days, bullying bosses and cuts in already-low wages - 1910

Great Steel Strike begins; 350,000 workers demand union recognition. The AFL Iron and Steel Organizing Committee calls off the strike, their goal unmet, 108 days later - 1919

Martial law rescinded in Mingo County, W. Va., after police, U.S. troops and hired goons finally quell coal miners' strike - 1922

U.S. Steel announces it will cut the wages of 220,000 workers by 10 percent - 1931

United Textile Workers strike committee orders strikers back to work after 22 days out, ending what was at that point the greatest single industrial conflict in the history of American organized labor. The strike involved some 400,000 workers in New England, the mid-Atlantic states and the South - 1934
Some 400,000 coal miners strike for higher wages in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Illinois and Ohio - 1935

The AFL expels the Int’l Longshoremen's Association for racketeering; the union was readmitted to the then-AFL-CIO six years later - 1953

2013.09.16history-tools-trade
OSHA reaches its largest ever settlement agreement, $21 million, with BP Products North America following an explosion at BP's Texas City, Texas, plant earlier in the year that killed 15 and injured 170 - 2005

(Tools of the Trade: A Health and Safety Handbook for Action: This 180-page book is a valuable resource for those who want to promote worker health and safety while building their unions and community groups at the same time. It includes: Examples of successful workplace health and safety campaigns; Strategies to actively engage workers in advocating for their own protection; Specific tools for winning safety improvements, such as collecting information, using legal rights, working with the community; Step-by-step instructions for using these tools, complete with checklists, forms and resources.)

Eleven Domino's employees in Pensacola, Fla., form the nation's first union of pizza delivery drivers - 2006

San Francisco hotel workers end a 2-year contract fight, ratify a new 5-year pact with their employers - 2006

Blue Earth Digital Printing Employees Unanimously Ratify First Contract

Blue Earth Digital Printing Employees Unanimously Ratify First Contract



Employees of  Blue Earth Digital Printing  located in Culver City, Ca. voted unanimously to ratify a first time contract that was negotiated on their behalf  by International Representative, Mike Huggins and Myself with Blue Earth Digital Printing Owner, Fernando Bonada. International Lead Organizer, Marty Keegan was available to answer questions during the process of meeting with the owner, Fernando and when meeting with the employees to answer questions.

This whole process with Blue Earth was unique from the very beginning for the simple fact that  the employer, Fernando, contacted our Union office in order to Organize his print shop. Fernando explained that if it weren't for Unions there would be no middle class. Fernando further stated that he was previously employed in a union shop as was his father and has seen how it helped his family growing up. 

Fernando's legacy continues because our new Brother, Sheldon Ferdinand,
 is his Son and works in the shop with his Dad. Family businesses are in need of protection from big corporations and companies that make it difficult for the mom and pop print shops of the past to make a profit or exist any longer for that matter. We have the opportunity to organize such shops and encourage our network of Union businesses to utilize our union print shops to create the work they seek.

Fernando, once being a Union member, understands the role unions have played in improving the lives of is members and wishes to bring the same benefits to his shop.
Please welcome them to our family and consider having your printing needs met by Blue Earth Digital Printing

(Left to Right)
International Organizer,  Marty Keegan, 
Gilbert Bonada
Sheldon Ferdinand
Vivian M. Escalante
Osmen Molina
Adan S. Ramirez
GCC/IBT Local 140~N President, Ronnie Pineda

Photo by Jorge Perez

Saturday, September 21, 2013

Saturday Night in the Blogosphere

This is how many Americans will be sleeping tonight




Twitter: The angriest site on the Internet? - CNN Tech

Busted In Middle School -- For Midol - Advice Goddess

Fort Myers | It's a very s-l-o-w news night here - Gannett Blog

Layoffs are cutting newspapers’ brain, heart - The Salt Lake Tribune

Letter from ‘W. McAvoy’ is a passage from ‘Newsroom’ - Romenesko

Ban Ki-Moon Accused of Union-Busting at UN - Broadcast Union News

It's harder than ever to avoid your picture going public - Detroit Free-Press

A Touch of Class: Knowing Our Place on the Social Ladder - Frying Pan News

Nudist released on probation for delivering newspapers in the buff - Lehigh Valley

BitWall Allows Publishers To Make Money Through Micropayments - Tech Crunch

The people on Skid-row are regular people



The man on the left is the person who hired homeless people from Skid-row to wait in line for him to buy the new iPhone. When the store finally opened and he found out that they couldn't actually purchase the phones, he decided that he wasn't going to compensate the people who stood in line for hours. People who stood in line and slept in the open for around 12 hours overnight.

Neither did he arrange transport for them to go back to Skid-row as he had done to bring them to Pasadena to the store. This left around 75 homeless people stranded in Pasadena and lead to a disturbance which ended in 2 people being arrested.

You are not low if you are poor or you live on Skid-row. You are low when you use people like they are disposable, and toss them out when they are of no use to you!

The people on Skid-row are regular people like you and me who just fell on hard times. Most of these people are actually amazing human beings. It's just not their time to shine just yet!

Read the LA Times article on this incident here: http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-using-homeless-to-buy-new-iphones-sparks-outrage-20130921,0,5069855.story

SOURCE: MONDAY NIGHT MISSION

Today in Labor History


Militia sent to Leadville, Colo., to break miners’ strike - 1896

Mother Jones leads a march of miners' children through the streets of Charleston, W. Va. - 1912

National Football League Players Association members begin what is to become a 57-day strike, their first regular-season walkout ever - 1982

Members of five unions at the Frontier Hotel-Casino in Las Vegas begin what was to become the longest successful hotel strike in U.S. history. All 550 workers honored the picket line for the entirety of the 6-year, 4-month, 10-day fight against management’s insistence on cutting wages and eliminating pensions - 1991

DoD: 5,000 Military Families Losing Food Stamps | Military.com

DoD: 5,000 Military Families Losing Food Stamps | Military.com

Annual Veteran's Appreciation and Heritage Day Powwow


Gannett Blog: USAT | N.Y. firm files lawsuit over Hilton portal;...

Gannett Blog: USAT | N.Y. firm files lawsuit over Hilton portal;...: A New York City publisher and technology consultant has sued USA Today over development services it provided for a digital news portal cal...

Friday, September 20, 2013

The Syria documentary film "Not Anymore: A Story of Revolution" by Matthew VanDyke

"Not Anymore: A Story of Revolution" is a 15 minute documentary film about the war in Syria, directed by American Matthew VanDyke (a former prisoner of war and combat veteran of the Libyan Revolution in 2011 - http://www.matthewvandyke.com), and produced by Matthew VanDyke and Nour Kelze (a Syrian journalist who is also the star of the film).

The film tells the story of the Syrian struggle for freedom as experienced by a 32 year old rebel commander, Mowya, and a 24 year old female journalist, Nour Kelze, in Aleppo, Syria.
The film clearly and concisely shows why the Syrian people are fighting for their freedom, told through the emotional words of two powerful characters whose lives have been turned upside down and torn apart by war.

This documentary film was a very personal project for director Matthew VanDyke. Having fought in the Libyan Revolution in 2011, he identified with Syrian Revolution and was compelled to make a film that would show the world who the Syrian rebels are and what they are fighting for. In this spirit, he hopes to eventually release the film in 20 languages so that people around the world can truly understand the fight for freedom in Syria.

Filming in Syria was dangerous and difficult. VanDyke and Kelze faced aerial bombardment, artillery, mortars, snipers, and the persistent threat of kidnapping. In addition, VanDyke was branded a terrorist by the Assad regime on the Syrian State TV channels.

This will take a continuous effort. Please step up and join the team. Each of you must do your part each day to spread this film and its message if it is going to have the impact it was created to have.
If you care about Syria, about humanity, about the right of men and women to choose their own leaders and destiny, about liberty and justice for ALL, then this is YOUR film.

Use it to make your impact on this revolution!

LA Cowboy: 70's Degree Weather Predicted for This Saturday's 2 Hour Walking Tours of Historic Downtown Los Angeles Starting at The Last Bookstore at 5th & Spring in the Spring Arts Tower

LA Cowboy: 70's Degree Weather Predicted for This Saturday's 2 Hour Walking Tours of Historic Downtown Los Angeles Starting at The Last Bookstore at 5th and Spring in the Spring Arts Tower

Ramona Middle School Drug Free

La Verne, California

After picking up my granddaughter from Ramona Middle school we chatted on her day and I asked; "Anything unusual happen today?" Most of the time her answer is no, just another day at school, but today she said yes.

She explained to me that the La Verne Police Department paid a visit to the school with drug sniffing dogs in tow, but she wasn't sure if they visited all the classrooms or just her particular class?

After introducing himself and the dog and explaining what they were about to do, the dog went to work sniffing the thirteen and fourteen year olds back packs, seeking illegal drugs of any type.

Unfortunately for my granddaughter, the dog starting acting oddly when it came upon her back pack, so without requesting permission, the officer began searching through her things, and hit pay dirt.

Yes the officer pulled prepackaged pills from her back pack and asked her "what is this?" And she explained it was used to stop back pain and cramps. Then he asked, in front of all of her classmates "do you really need this?" Is it really his business to ask?

As we waste billions to combat drugs, the war on drugs was lost many years ago.

Here's what was discovered in her back pack.





Patch reporter ordered to reveal source or face jail, fines

Patch reporter ordered to reveal source or face jail, fines

Today in Labor History


Upton Sinclair, socialist and author of The Jungle—published on this day in 1906—born in Baltimore, Md. - 1878

According to folklorist John Garst, steel-drivin’ man John Henry, born a slave, outperformed a steam hammer on this date at the Coosa Mountain Tunnel or the Oak Mountain Tunnel of the Columbus and Western Railway (now part of the Norfolk Southern) near Leeds, Ala. Other researchers place the contest near Talcott, W. Va. - 1887

Int’l Hod Carriers, Building & Common Laborers Union of America changes name to Laborers' Int’l Union - 1965

September 19

2013.09.16history-solidarity-day-march
Chinese coal miners forced out of Black Diamond, Wash. - 1885

Between 400,000 and 500,000 unionists converge on Washington D.C., for a Solidarity Day march and rally protesting Republican policies - 1981

Friday Morning in the Blogosphere



A Census of Poverty - Frying Pan News

A brief history of newspaper lingo - The Week

Learning with newspapers - Albert Lea Tribune

Trust in Media Recovers Slightly From All-Time Low - Gallup

Reuters is suffering the same fate as newspapers - Paid Content

Spoiler alert: Parsing those Butterfly communiqués - Gannett Blog

New York Times Co. pays dividend for first time since 2008 - Poynter

Notice the difference in Grand Theft Auto ad treatment - Kevin Roderick

Four Gannett newspapers will get a daily USA Today insert - Romenesko

162 Years Ago, The New York Times Began Publishing - Newspaper Alum


Gannett Blog: Butterfly | Welcome to Corporate's talking points

Gannett Blog: Butterfly | Welcome to Corporate's talking points: "We will add more local news and, in partnership with USA Today , we will add more national, sports and lifestyle news." -...

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Register puts first Simers column outside the paywall - LA Observed

Register puts first Simers column outside the paywall - LA Observed

Today in Labor History


The Teamsters for a Democratic Union (TDU) is formally founded at an Ohio convention, during a period of serious corruption in the union. Two years earlier at an IBT convention in Las Vegas, a union reform leader who (unsuccessfully) called for direct election of officers and a limit on officers’ salaries had been beaten by 2013.09.16history-usps-morris-curseenthugs - 1978

Nine strikebreakers are killed in an explosion at Giant (gold) Mine near Yellowknife, in Canada’s Northwest Territories. Miner Roger Warren confessed that he planted the explosives that caused the deaths. He recanted the confession but later confessed once again - 1992

A 20-month illegal lockout of 2,900 Steelworkers members at Kaiser Aluminum plants in three states ends when an arbitrator orders a new contract. Kaiser was forced to fire scabs and fork over tens of millions of dollars in back pay to union members - 1999

One week after the September 11, 2001, attacks, anthrax spores are mailed by an unknown party to several news media offices and two U.S. senators. Five people exposed to the spores died, including two workers at Washington, D.C.’s USPS Brentwood facility: Thomas Morris Jr. and Joseph Curseen - 2001               

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Gannett Blog: In Louisiana, can parachuting publishers respond?

Gannett Blog: In Louisiana, can parachuting publishers respond?: Even by Gannett standards, today's announcement about a new publisher  for two Louisiana newspapers really sticks out. Terzotis C...

LA Times goes for a new demographic - LA Observed

LA Times goes for a new demographic - LA Observed

Meals Lost from SNAP Cuts Would Exceed Total Annual Food Bank Distribution

The nutrition-only farm bill being considered in the House of Representatives would cut $40 billion from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), leading to billions of lost meals for low-income people. As a result, 850,000 households would lose an average $90 per month in SNAP benefits, 4 to 6 million individuals would lose their SNAP benefits entirely, and 210,000 children would lose free school meals.

These cuts would come on top of SNAP benefit reductions that will impact all SNAP participants starting in November 2013. Congress voted in 2010 to rescind early a temporary SNAP benefit boost provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The SNAP ARRA cut will cause a family of four to lose $36 per month from their maximum benefits starting in November, a loss of $432 over the course of the year.

Together, the SNAP meals lost in 2014 from the scheduled ARRA cuts and the proposed farm bill cuts (nearly 3.4 billion meals) would exceed the projected annual meal distribution by Feeding America food banks around the country (3.3 billion meals). Following a 46 percent increase in demand during the recession, food banks are already struggling to meet need in their communities and will be unable to make up the difference. Charity can’t make up for lost SNAP meals. Congress must protect SNAP in the farm bill.


 Analysis by Feeding America  1.The $40 billion SNAP cut in the House nutrition-only farm bill divided evenly over 10 years would equal $4 billion in lost SNAP benefits in FY14. Lost meals calculated using average cost of a meal ($2.67) from Feeding America's annual Map the Meal Gap report. 2. The value of SNAP benefits lost due to the ARRA cut is $5 billion in FY14. Lost meals calculated using average cost of a meal ($2.67) from Feeding America's annual Map the Meal Gap report. 3. Feeding America's internal meal projections for Feeding America Fiscal Year 2014 (July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014).

SOURCE: FEEDING AMERICA

Monday Night Mission

Monday Night Mission
 
 
 
 
By Mel Tillekeratne
Last Thursday night we arrived on Skid-row to see a fight in full motion. 3 women punching, kicking and stepping on a 4th woman on the ground. When I got to where it was the fight was over. The woman who got beaten up was lying on the ground with blood dripping down her face.

Her lips were cut up and one side of her nostril was split open, her eyes bruised purple. The other women complained of how she randomly approached them and started attacking. More people told me that she was the aggressor and even how she had punched a pregnant lady.

She wasn't a stranger to me. I remembered her as clear as day. This was the same woman who tried to punch me the very night before for telling her she needed to wait in line for food.

She wasn't drunk and neither was she high. She was just a person who was sick. She had no idea who she was or where she was, and she was at war against the whole world. I have seen enough people just like her to know what was wrong. She was severely mentally ill. She didn't want any help from us or anyone. She just walked away into the darkness, another lost soul on Skid-row.
This week the San Francisco city attorney filed a class action lawsuit against the state of Nevada on behalf of all California local governments where patients had been bused from a Las Vegas psychiatric hospital. This wasn't 20 or 30 years ago. The Rawson-Neal Psychiatric Hospital was caught after dumping 48-year-old James Flavy Coy Brown in Sacramento in March of this year.

James didn't have anyone or didn't even know anyone in Sacramento. That didn't stop the hospital. They just put this poor man suffering from severe mood disorders onto a Greyhound and shipped him off of their hands to Sacramento. Just call 911 when you get there they told him.

James sadly wasn't the only one. They traced around 1500 more patients to this hospital. But then again this is all they found. Hundreds of people treated like trash and tossed away.

Honestly I don't know what angers me the most. The people who treat mentally ill people this way or the people who choose to ignore helping people like this calling them drug addicts. Because that's what people tell me. "I don't want to waste my time and money helping people on Skid-row. They're all drug addicts and they choose to be there."

500 of the people who were sent from Rawson-Neal were sent to Skid-row. This is without the thousands, yes thousands who have been dumped from mental hospitals all over California because Rawson-Neal wasn’t the first and sadly won't be the last. Around 60 to 70% of the people on Skid-row suffer from mental disorders. Some very apparent but most only visible when you get to know them.

No one chooses to live on Skid-row. The mentally ill don't decide one day that "Oh I'm going to spend the rest of my life on Skid-row". It's easily one of the worst places I have ever visited and I come from a country you consider poor. If the rats, cockroaches and diseases doesn't get to you then the violence surely will. Most people there turn to drugs because they were forced to by gangs or because it's a form of self-medication for their mental illnesses. Look it up if you don't believe me.

If you're still not sure about the people of Skid-row then come with us and we'll show you what Skid-row really is. You owe it to yourself if you ever considered yourself fair and just. If you don't care and still choose to ignore helping the people of Skid-row saying they're drug addicts then you are no more heartless than the bastards at Rawson-Neal.

"Be the change you wish to see in the world." - Gandhi

Mel Tillekeratne

Monday Night Mission

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-san-francisco-patient-dumping-suit-20130910,0,958771,full.story