Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Gwen Ifill, Washington journalist, 61

Gwen Ifill, Washington journalist, 61: Ifill died of cancer complications. Co-anchor Judy Woodruff gave viewers the news on

Our Visit to Baguio City

Patrick Soon-Shiong purchased another combined 34,040 shares of Tronc on Nov. 11 and 14th for a bit over $12 a share

Tuesday, November 01, 2016

Tuesday Morning in the Blogosphere


tronc, a train-wreak in the making 



Wall Street Journal feels the pain - Politico

Gannett abandons bid to buy Tronc - Poynter

Shoptalk: The Value of Newspapers - Editor and Publisher

Thomson Reuters to cut 2,000 jobs worldwide - The Guardian

Where have all the unbiased newspapers gone? - MSU Reporter

Gannett Abandons Effort to Buy Newspaper Publisher Tronc - New York Times

Why is Jackson Rancheria casino tribe buying a newspaper? - The Sacramento Bee

Gannett's Bankers Can Look to Yellow Pages Bankruptcy for Caution on Tronc - The Street

Gannett pulls offer for Tronc, owner of L.A. Times, after six-month pursuit - Los Angeles Times

tronc Comments on Gannett’s Withdrawal of Its Proposal Due to Inability to Finance - Business Wire


Today in Labor History


In the nation’s first general strike for a 10-hour day, 300 armed Irish longshoremen marched through the streets of Philadelphia calling on other workers to join them.  Some 20,000 did, from clerks to bricklayers to city employees and other occupations.  The city announced a 10-hour workday within the week; private employers followed suit three weeks later – 1835
(Strikes Around the World: Are strikes going out of fashion or are they an inevitable feature of working life? This is a longstanding debate. The much-proclaimed ‘withering away of the strike’ in the 1950s was quickly overturned by the ‘resurgence of class conflict’ in the late 1960s and 1970s. The period since then has been characterized as one of ‘labor quiescence’. Commentators again predict the strike’s demise, at least in the former heartlands of capitalism.)
Thirty-seven Black striking Louisiana sugar workers are murdered when Louisiana militia, aided by bands of "prominent citizens," shoot unarmed workers trying to get a dollar-per-day wage. Two strike leaders are lynched - 1887

Malbone tunnel disaster in New York City; inexperienced scab motorman crashes five-car train during strike, 97 killed, 255 injured - 1918

Some 400,000 soft coal miners strike for higher wages and shorter hours - 1919

United Stone & Allied Products Workers of America merge with United Steelworkers of America - 1972

The UAW begins what was to become a successful 172-day strike against International Harvester. The union turned back company demands for weakened work rules, mandatory overtime - 1979

Honda assembles the first-ever Japanese car manufactured in a U.S. plant, in Marysville, Ohio - 1982

October 31

George Henry Evans publishes the first issue of the Working Man’s Advocate, “edited by a Mechanic” for the “useful and industrious classes” in New York City. He focused on the inequities between the “portion of society living in luxury and idleness” and those “groaning under the oppressions and miseries imposed on them.” - 1829
 
Tennessee sends in leased convict laborers to break a coal miners strike in Anderson County. The miners revolted, burned the stockades, and sent the captured convicts by train back to Knoxville - 1891
 
After 14 years of labor by 400 stone masons, the Mt. Rushmore sculpture is completed in Keystone, S.D.- 1941
 
Int'l Alliance of Bill Posters, Billers & Distributors of the United States & Canada surrenders its AFL-CIO charter and is disbanded - 1971