Monday, July 25, 2016

WSJ reporter detained at LAX, asked for her phones

WSJ reporter detained at LAX, asked for her phones: Homeland Security agents demanded that Maria Abi-Habib, who covers the Middle East, surrender her cellphones. She details the encounter on Facebook.

Today in Labor History

July 25  --  Union Communications Services, Inc.

Workers stage a general strike—believed to be the nation’s first—in St. Louis, in support of striking railroad workers. The successful strike was ended when some 3,000 federal troops and 5,000 deputized special police killed at least eighteen people in skirmishes around the city - 1877

New York garment workers win closed shop and firing of scabs after 7-month strike – 1890
(No Contract, No Peace: A Legal Guide to Contract Campaigns, Strikes, and Lockouts: This book is a must-have for any union or activist considering aggressive action to combat management’s growing economic war against workers. No Contract, No Peace! references recent union activities and NLRB decisions that have affected the labor relations environment. Schwartz’s familiarity with labor and employment law combines with his activist spirit to provide innovative yet practical tips for mounting and maintaining meaningful campaigns designed to build union and workers’ power.)

Fifteen “living dead women” testify before the Illinois Industrial Commission.  They were “Radium Girls,” women who died prematurely after working at clock and watch factories, where they were told to wet small paintbrushes in their mouths so they could dip them in radium to paint dials.  A Geiger counter passed over graves in a cemetery near Ottawa, Illinois still registers the presence of radium - 1937

The Teamsters and Service Employees unions break from the AFL-CIO during the federation's 50th convention to begin the Change to Win coalition, ultimately comprised of seven unions (4 by 2011: SEIU, Teamsters, UFCW and the UFW). They say they want more emphasis on organizing and less on electoral politics - 2005

LA Times staff told to keep political opinions off social media

LA Times staff told to keep political opinions off social media

Thursday, July 14, 2016

NYT's Michael Cieply named editor of Deadline

NYT's Michael Cieply named editor of Deadline: Michael Cieply, the longtime anchor of New York Times Hollywood coverage in the Los Angeles bureau, is joining Deadline as the executive editor.

Today in Labor History

July 14  --  Union Communications Services, Inc.

The Great Uprising nationwide railway strike begins in Martinsburg, W.Va., after railroad workers are hit with their second pay cut in a year. In the following days, strike riots spread through 17 states. The next week, federal troops were called out to force an end to the strike - 1877
 
Woody Guthrie, writer of "This Land is Your Land" and "Union Maid," born in Okemah, Okla. - 1912
(Woody Guthrie: A Life: Folksinger and political activist Woody Guthrie contributed much to the American labor movement, not the least of which are his classic anthems "Union Maid" and "This Land Is Your Land." This is perhaps his best-ever biography, written by bestselling author Joe Klein (Primary Colors, The Running Mate). It is an easy-to-read, honest description of Guthrie’s life, from a childhood of poverty to a youth spent "bummin’ around" to an adulthood of music and organizing—and a life cut short by incurable disease.)
 
Italian immigrants and anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti are convicted in Massachusetts of murder and payroll robbery—unfairly, most historians agree—after a 2-month trial, and are eventually executed. Fifty years after their deaths the state's governor issued a proclamation saying they had been treated unfairly and that "any disgrace should be forever removed from their names." - 1921



July 13
Southern Tenant Farmers' Union organized in Tyronza, Ark. - 1934
 
Detroit newspaper workers begin 19-month strike against Gannett, Knight-Ridder. The strike was to become a lockout, which lasted four years more - 1995








July 12
Bisbee, Ariz., deports Wobblies; 1,186 miners sent into desert in manure-laden boxcars. They had been fighting for improved safety and working conditions - 1917
 
The Screen Actors Guild holds its first meeting. Among those attending: future horror movie star (Frankenstein’s Monster) and union activist Boris Karloff - 1933



July 11
Striking coal miners in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, dynamite barracks housing Pinkerton management thugs - 1892
 
After seven years of labor by as many as 2,800 construction workers, the Triborough Bridge opens in New York.  Actually a complex of three bridges, it connects the boroughs of Manhattan, the Bronx and Queens.  Construction began on Black Friday, 1929, and New Deal money turned it into one of the largest public works projects of the Great Depression - 1936
 
A nine-year strike begins at the Ohio Crankshaft Division of Park-Ohio Industries in Cleveland. Overcoming scabs, arrests and firings, UAW Local 91 members hung on and approved a contract in 1992 with the company—now under new management—that included company-funded health and retirement benefits, as well as pay increases – 1983

Nick Ut announces his (2017) retirement from AP Photo*

Nick Ut announces his (2017) retirement from AP Photo*: He joined the Saigon bureau of Associated Press in 1965, and has been a fixture in the LA bureau.

Thursday Afternoon in the Blogosphere


Photo credit Omar B├írcena/Flickr



The Dolan family buys back Newsday - Politico

LAT alum gets promoted at the NYT - LAObserved

The Life and Death of Phil Anschutz's Examiner.com - WestWord

How (Not) To Name A Company In The Digital Era - Value Walk

Bluefield Daily Telegraph to decommission press operations - BDT

Why Tronc's ridiculous plan to produce 2,000 videos a day is doomed - Vox

Books, newspapers deemed 'privilege' at academic conference - Campus Reform

Can Publishers Step Away From the Brink of Peak Content? - Editor and Publisher

Some Are Aghast That a Los Angeles Times Building Could Be Razed - LA Weekly

Young and old news consumers want to get their news in very different ways - Nieman Lab


Sunday, July 10, 2016

More details on mixed use plan for LA Times buildings

More details on mixed use plan for LA Times buildings: Offices and retail in the older buildings, while it looks like the 1970s corporate side will be razed for apartments.

Today in Labor History


Mary McLeod Bethune, educator and civil rights activist, born - 1875

Some 14,000 federal and state troops finally succeed in putting down the strike against the Pullman Palace Car Co., which had been peaceful until July 5, when federal troops intervened in Chicago, against the repeated protests of the governor and Chicago’s mayor. A total of 34 American Railway Union members were killed by troops over the course of the strike - 1894

A powerful explosion rips through the Rolling Mill coal mine in Johnstown, Pa., killing 112 miners, 83 of whom were immigrants from Poland and Slovakia - 1902

The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce holds a mass meeting of more than 2,000 merchants to organize what was to become a frontal assault on union strength and the closed shop. The failure of wages to keep up with inflation after the 1906 earthquake had spurred multiple strikes in the city - 1916
Sidney Hillman dies at age 59. He led the Amalgamated Clothing Workers, was a key figure in the founding of the Congress of Industrial Organizations and was a close advisor to President Franklin D. Roosevelt - 1946

Boyarsky, Olney, Baum, Moxley win at Press Club awards

Boyarsky, Olney, Baum, Moxley win at Press Club awards: The annual Los Angeles Press Club awards were handed out Sunday night. Here are the winners.

Thursday, June 23, 2016

Tronc makes it official - from CEO Justin Dearborn

Colleagues,

Today, we officially rebranded as tronc, Inc. and will begin trading on the Nasdaq exchange under the stock ticker “TRNC.”

Our iconic institutions are some of the most respected brands in the world and will remain as such. tronc does not exist without the strength and integrity of the Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, Orlando Sentinel, Sun Sentinel, The San Diego Union-Tribune, The Baltimore Sun, Hartford Courant, Daily Press, The Morning Call and the many local community verticals we own. Collectively, our publications have earned 92 Pulitzer Prize awards and garner an impressive monthly audience of over 60 million, reflecting the commitment and quality that each of you contribute. No other media company can match the power of our brands.

We are a content company first, last, and always – but in the face of disruption, we must evolve to preserve and grow our iconic brands. Our commitment to journalism has not changed, but we are deploying new technologies to bring our content to life and make it more accessible and visual to our ever-evolving audience.

Malcolm CasSelle, Chief Technology Officer and President of New Ventures, and newly appointed Chief Digital Officer Anne Vasquez are going to be visiting all of our local markets this week, sharing our vision and strategy behind tronc. They have also created this video to introduce tronc, what it means and how technology will help make our journalism even more powerful.

We are excited for the opportunity to meet and speak with many of you. The foundation of this company is rooted in our employees who deliver the news in our organizations, some of which have been serving their community with distinction for more than 250 years. With your commitment, we will continue to extend the influence of our titles and deepen our connections to our communities.

Best,

Justin

Mike Carlson Retires from the Los Angeles Times

After spending forty-five years producing newspapers for the Los Angeles Times Mike Carlson has decided to hang it up and retire to the easy life.

Mike has seen many changes over his four and a half decade career, from Letterpress printing to offset, from manually operated presses to computer controlled machines.

Ownership of the newspaper changed several times, and publishers came and went rather quickly.

Mike helped open the Chatsworth Production Facility, and watched as it was closed as business fled to social media.

Mike was always cheerful and had many different jokes he would share with his colleagues while toiling away at getting the daily newspaper published.

Congratulations Mike on a job well done.





tronc employee video



What is PLONFT, and how is it the future of journalism?


Today in Labor History

June 23  --  Union Communications Services, Inc.

Charles Moyer, president of the Western Federation of Miners, goes to Butte, Mont. in an attempt to mediate a conflict between factions of the miner’s local there. It didn’t go well. Gunfight in the union hall killed one man; Moyer and other union officers left the building, which was then leveled in a dynamite blast - 1914

Congress overrides President Harry Truman's veto of the anti-worker Taft-Hartley Act. The law weakened unions and let states exempt themselves from union requirements. Twenty states immediately enacted open shop laws and more followed - 1947

OSHA issues standard on cotton dust to protect 600,000 workers from byssinosis, also known as "brown lung" - 1978

A majority of the 5,000 textile workers at six Fieldcrest Cannon textile plants in Kannapolis, N.C., vote for union representation after an historic 25-year fight - 1999

June 22
A total of 86 passengers on a train carrying members of the Hagenbeck-Wallace Circus are killed, another 127 injured in a wreck near Hammond, Indiana.  Five days later the dead are buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in Forest Park, Ill., in an area set aside as Showmen’s Rest, purchased only a few months earlier by the Showmen’s League of America - 1918

Violence erupted during a coal mine strike at Herrin, Ill. A total of 36 were killed, 21 of them non-union miners - 1922

June 21
In England, a compassionate parliament declares that children can't be required to work more than 12 hours a day. And they must have an hour’s instruction in the Christian Religion every Sunday and not be required to sleep more than two in a bed - 1802
(Kids at Work: Your heart will be broken by this exceptional book’s photographs of children at backbreaking, often life-threatening work, and the accompanying commentary by author Russell Freedman. Photographer Lewis Hine—who himself died in poverty in 1940—did as much, and perhaps more, than any social critic in the early part of the 20th century to expose the abuse of children, as young as three and four, by American capitalism.)

Ten miners accused of being militant "Molly Maguires" are hanged in Pennsylvania. A private corporation initiated the investigation of the 10 through a private detective agency. A private police force arrested them, and private attorneys for the coal companies prosecuted them. "The state provided only the courtroom and the gallows," a judge said many years later - 1877

The U.S. Supreme Court upholds the right of unions to publish statements urging members to vote for a specific congressional candidate, ruling that such advocacy is not a violation of the Federal Corrupt Practices Act - 1948

An estimated 100,000 unionists and other supporters march in solidarity with striking Detroit News and Detroit Free Press newspaper workers - 1997

Thursday Afternoon in the Blogosphere




Tronc’s Data Delusion - Harvard Business Review

Tronc offers raises to newsroom employees - Politico

Tronc's star executives launch newsroom tour - Politico

U-T owner omits San Diego from video - San Diego Reader

Block 37 owner nears deal for Tribune Tower - Chicago Business

Top executive shows the world how to do unemployment right - Quartz

Jack Fuller, ex-Tribune editor and publisher, dies at 69 - Chicago Tribune

Steve Mosko Goes Shopping: Tribune Media Tops on His List - The Wrap

Drone journalism will be legally possible in any U.S. newsroom - NiemanLab

Why a major newspaper publisher renamed itself "Tronc" and released a silly video - Vox

Monday, June 20, 2016

Today in Labor History

June 20  --  Union Communications Services, Inc.

Birth of Albert Parsons, Haymarket martyr - 1848

The American Railway Union, headed by Eugene Debs, is founded in Chicago. In the Pullman strike a year later, the union was defeated by federal injunctions and troops, and Debs was imprisoned for violating the injunctions - 1893

Henry Ford recognizes the United Auto Workers, signs contract for workers at River Rouge plant - 1941

Striking African-American auto workers are attacked by KKK, National Workers League, and armed White workers at Belle Isle amusement park in Detroit. Two days of riots follow, 34 people are killed, more than 1,300 arrested - 1943
(All Labor Has Dignity: Dr. Martin Luther  King was every bit as committed to economic justice as he was to ending racial segregation. He fought throughout his life to connect the labor and civil rights movements, envisioning them as twin pillars for social reform. As we struggle with massive unemployment, a staggering racial wealth gap, and the near collapse of a financial system that puts profits before people, this collection of King's speeches on labor rights and economic justice underscore his relevance for today. They help us imagine King anew: as a human rights leader whose commitment to unions and an end to poverty was a crucial part of his civil rights agenda.)

The Taft-Hartley Labor Management Relations Act, curbing strikes, is vetoed by President Harry S. Truman. The veto was overridden three days later by a Republican-controlled Congress - 1947

Oil began traveling through the Alaska pipeline. Seventy thousand people worked on building the pipeline, history's largest privately-financed construction project - 1977

Evelyn Dubrow, described by the New York Times as organized labor's most prominent lobbyist at the time of its greatest power, dies at age 95. The Int’l Ladies' Garment Workers Union lobbyist once told the Times that "she trudged so many miles around Capitol Hill that she wore out 24 pairs of her size 4 shoes each year." She retired at age 86 - 2006

Tribune has a buyer for Times building in DTLA

Tribune has a buyer for Times building in DTLA: Onni group, based in Vancouver, has other projects in downtown and would redevelop the longtime LA Times home for offices and retail.

Friday, June 17, 2016

Thank you Frontier Communications

I have been offline since Sunday thanks to my new internet service provider Frontier Communications.
My patience is beginning to run low as I'm searching for options such as HughesNet, and Time Warner Cable. Unfortunately the cable will not be available in my neighborhood till the end of September of this year.

To grasp the magnitude of the outage follow this link Frontier Outage .