Monday, September 26, 2016

Today in Labor History

September 26
Union Communications Services, Inc.

The Old 97, a Southern Railway train officially known as the Fast Mail, derails near Danville, Va., killing engineer Joseph “Steve” Broady and ten other railroad and postal workers.  Many believe Broady had been ordered to speed to make up for lost time.  The Wreck of the Old 97 inspired balladeers; a 1924 recording is sometimes cited as the first million-selling country music record - 1903
 
The first production Ford Model T leaves the Piquette Plant in Detroit, Mich. It was the first car ever manufactured on an assembly line, with interchangeable parts. The auto industry was to become a major U.S. employer, accounting for as many as one of every eight to 10 jobs in the country - 1908

Friday, September 23, 2016

Today in Labor History

September 23  --  Union Communications Services, Inc.

The Workingman's Advocate of Chicago publishes the first installment of The Other Side, by Martin A. Foran, president of the Coopers' Int’l Union. Believed to be the first novel by a trade union leader and some say the first working-class novel ever published in the U.S. - 1868
 
A coalition of Knights of Labor and trade unionists in Chicago launch the United Labor party, calling for an 8-hour day, government ownership of telegraph and telephone companies, and monetary and land reform. The party elects seven state assembly men and one senator - 1886
 
A 42-month strike by Steelworkers at Bayou Steel in Louisiana ends in a new contract and the ousting of scabs - 1996
 
California Gov. Gray Davis (D) signs legislation making the state the first to offer workers paid family leave - 2002

September 22
Emancipation Proclamation signed - 1862
 
Eighteen-year-old Hannah (Annie) Shapiro leads a spontaneous walkout of 17 women at a Hart Schaffner & Marx garment factory in Chicago. It grows into a months-long mass strike involving 40,000 garment workers across the city, protesting 10-hour days, bullying bosses and cuts in already-low wages - 1910
 
Great Steel Strike begins; 350,000 workers demand union recognition. The AFL Iron and Steel Organizing Committee calls off the strike, their goal unmet, 108 days later - 1919
 
Martial law rescinded in Mingo County, W. Va., after police, U.S. troops and hired goons finally quell coal miners' strike - 1922
 
U.S. Steel announces it will cut the wages of 220,000 workers by 10 percent - 1931
 
United Textile Workers strike committee orders strikers back to work after 22 days out, ending what was at that point the greatest single industrial conflict in the history of American organized labor. The strike involved some 400,000 workers in New England, the mid-Atlantic states and the South - 1934
 
Some 400,000 coal miners strike for higher wages in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Illinois and Ohio - 1935
 
The AFL expels the Int’l Longshoremen's Association for racketeering; six years later the AFL-CIO accepted them back into the house of labor - 1953
 
OSHA reaches its largest ever settlement agreement, $21 million, with BP Products North America following an explosion at BP's Texas City, Texas, plant earlier in the year that killed 15 and injured 170 - 2005
 
Eleven Domino's employees in Pensacola, Fla., form the nation's first union of pizza delivery drivers - 2006
 
San Francisco hotel workers end a 2-year contract fight, ratify a new 5-year pact with their employers - 2006

September 21
Militia sent to Leadville, Colo., to break miners’ strike - 1896
 
Mother Jones leads a march of miners' children through the streets of Charleston, W. Va. - 1912
(Mother Jones Speaks: Speeches and Writings: You can read here the actual speech Jones made on this day in 1912 to striking coal miners in Charleston, WV:  “…this crime, starvation and murder of the innocents, so they can fill the operators’ pockets, and build dog kennels for the workers.  Is it right?” Admirers of Mother Jones will want this comprehensive collection of her speeches, letters, articles, interviews and testimony before Congressional committees. In her own words, this brave and determined heroine, active from the end of the Civil War until shortly before her death in 1930, explains her life, her mission, her passion on behalf of working people.)
 
National Football League Players Association members begin what is to become a 57-day strike, their first regular-season walkout ever - 1982 
 
Members of five unions at the Frontier Hotel-Casino in Las Vegas begin what was to become the longest successful hotel strike in U.S. history. All 550 workers honored the picket line for the entirety of the 6-year, 4-month, 10-day fight against management’s insistence on cutting wages and eliminating pensions - 1991






September 20
Upton Sinclair, socialist and author of The Jungle—published on this day in 1906—born in Baltimore, Md. - 1878
 
According to folklorist John Garst, steel-drivin’ man John Henry, born a slave, outperformed a steam hammer on this date at the Coosa Mountain Tunnel or the Oak Mountain Tunnel of the Columbus and Western Railway (now part of the Norfolk Southern) near Leeds, Ala. Other researchers place the contest near Talcott, W. Va. - 1887
 
Int’l Hod Carriers, Building & Common Laborers Union of America changes name to Laborers' Int’l Union - 1965



September 19
Chinese coal miners forced out of Black Diamond, Wash. - 1885
 
Between 400,000 and 500,000 unionists converge on Washington D.C., for a Solidarity Day march and rally protesting Republican policies – 1981
Musician and labor educator Joe Glazer, often referred to as “Labor’s Troubadour,” died today at age 88.  Some of his more acclaimed songs include "The Mill Was Made of Marble," "Too Old To Work" and "Automaton." In 1979 he and labor folklorist Archie Green convened a meeting of 14 other labor musicians to begin what was to become the annual Great Labor Arts Exchange and, soon thereafter, the Labor Heritage Foundation - 2006

Vin Scully tribute to air live across SoCal

Vin Scully tribute to air live across SoCal: Friday night pre-game ceremony at Dodger Stadium will air at 6:30 on KTLA Channel 5, SportsNet LA and KLAC radio.

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Today in Labor History

September 14  --  Union Communications Services, Inc.


The Amalgamated Association of Iron, Steel, and Tin Workers union calls off an unsuccessful 3-month strike against U. S. Steel Corporation subsidiaries - 1901

Gastonia, N.C., textile mill striker and songwriter Ella May Wiggins, 29, a mother of five, is killed when local vigilantes and thugs force the pickup truck in which she is riding off the road and begin shooting – 1929

A striker is shot by a bog owner (and town-elected official) during a walkout by some 1,500 cranberry pickers, members of the newly-formed Cape Cod Cranberry Pickers Union Local 1. State police were called, more strikers were shot and 64 were arrested. The strike was lost - 1933

Congress passes the Landrum-Griffin Act. The law expands many of the anti-labor provisions of the Taft-Hartley Act, increasing union reporting requirements and restricting secondary boycotting and picketing - 1959
(The Essential Guide To Federal Employment Laws, 4th edition: This is a well-indexed book, updated in 2013, offering the full text of 20 federal laws affecting workers’ lives, along with plain-English explanations of each. An entire chapter is devoted to each law, explaining what is allowed and prohibited and what businesses must comply with.)

Wednesday Morning in the Blogosphere


Los Angeles Times building at 2nd and Spring Streets



Despite Gannett's pursuit, Tronc eyes digital acquisitions - Poynter

Newspapers peddle coffee, wine as revenues slip - Brampton Guardian

Newsrooms: Debunk fake news stories for journalism’s sake - Editors Weblog

Tronc Said in Active Talks on Gannett Bid of About $673 Million - Bloomberg

The Obituary of the Los Angeles Times’ Heart and Soul - LA Downtown News

Harold Evans on the Man Who Might Save Newspapers - TownandCountrymag.com

Free Press – A pictorial history of underground newspapers 1965-1975 - Boing Boing

Why Colorado newspapers from the 1800s are going … digital? - The Colorado Independent

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

How It`s Made | Newspapers



Why doesn’t Gannett just drop its Tronc bid?

Scenario: Gannett withdraws bid, Tronc shares plummet, Gannett returns as savior instead of interloper



When officials at Tronc (formerly known as Tribune Publishing) canceled a September roadshow highlighting to investors in a half-dozen cities the bright future of the company just a day after announcing it, speculation began in earnest among Tronc’s close watchers. Was it as mundane as trouble with Air Ferro? Did the company fear underwhelming audiences on the tour? Or did it have something to do with the continuing efforts of Gannett, the country’s largest newspaper chain, to buy the company?

Read more: politico.com

Today in Labor History

Union Communications Services, Inc.
September 13
The Post Office Department orders 25,000 railway mail clerks to shoot to kill any bandits attempting to rob the mail - 1926

Eleven AFSCME-represented prison employees, 33 inmates die in four days of rioting at New York State’s Attica Prison and the retaking of the prison. The riot caused the nation to take a closer look at prison conditions, for inmates and their guards alike - 1971


September 12
Eugene V. Debs, labor leader and socialist, sentenced to 10 years for opposing World War I. While in jail Debs received one million votes for president - 1918
(The Bending Cross: A Biography of Eugene V. Debs: Eugene V. Debs was a labor activist in the late 19th and early 20th centuries who captured the heart and soul of the nation’s working people. He was brilliant, sincere, compassionate and scrupulously honest. A founder of one of the nation’s first industrial unions, the American Railway Union, he went on to help launch the Industrial Workers of the World—the Wobblies. A man of firm beliefs and dedication, he ran for President of the United States five times under the banner of the Socialist Party, in 1912 earning 6 percent of the popular vote.)

Jobless workers march on grocery stores and seize food in Toledo, Ohio – 1932

National Guardsmen fire on “sullen and rebellious” strikers at the Woonsocket (Rhode Island) Rayon plant, killing one and injuring three others.  A correspondent said the crowd of about 2,000 “went completely wild with rage.”  Word spread, 6,000 more workers arrived at the scene and the city was put under military rule.  The governor declared that “there is a Communist uprising and not a textile strike” in the state - 1934

United Rubber Workers formed in Akron, Ohio - 1935

A total of 49 people are killed, 200 injured, in explosion at the Hercules Powder Company plant in Kenvil, N.J. - 1940

New York City’s Union Square, the site of the first Labor Day in 1882, is officially named a national historic landmark. The square has long been a focal point for working class protest and political expression - 1998

Tuesday Morning in the Blogosphere

The beautiful produce of Aritao, Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines




Yes, the News Can Survive the Newspaper - New York Times

Gannett Leads Investment Round in Social Media Pioneer Digg - WSJ

Even newspapers ads aren't declining as fast as desktop ads - Mashable

Facebook reinstates Vietnam photo after outcry over censorship - Reuters

NY Times editor: I'd risk jail to publish Donald Trump's taxes - CNN Money

ASNE stops trying to count total job losses in American newsrooms - Poynter

Former LA Times reporter on story that led to $185 million Wells Fargo fine - CJR

The Newspaper Industry: What's Really Dying? - The Massachusetts Daily Collegian

Sale of Vermont Newspapers to New Hampshire Businessmen Nearly Complete - MPBN

Statement from Gawker Editorial Union on Univision's Deletion of News Stories - Gizmoto

Saturday, September 10, 2016

Today in Labor History

September 10  --  Union Communications Services, Inc.


In Pennsylvania, Polish, Lithuanian and Slovak miners are gunned down by the Lattimer Mine’s sheriff deputies—19 dead, more than 50 wounded—during a peaceful march from Hazelton to Lattimer.   Some 3,000 were marching for collective bargaining and civil liberty.  The shooters were tried for murder but the jury failed to convict – 1897

Friday, September 09, 2016

Journalism: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)



More details on mixed use plan for LA Times buildings

More details on mixed use plan for LA Times buildings: Offices and retail in the older buildings, while it looks like the 1970s corporate side will be razed for apartments.

Tronc abruptly cancels road show

Photo: Getty Images






So much for next week’s road show to promote Tronc stock.
The newspaper publisher formerly known as Tribune has abruptly cancelled the multi-city road show that was slated to begin on Monday, The Post has learned.
No reason for the cancellation was immediately available.
The existence of the road show, reported exclusively by The Post on Sept. 7, raised eyebrows because, according to sources, Tronc is in talks with Gannett over its roughly $18.50-a-share unsolicited offer for the Chicago company.
Some saw the scheduling of the road show, that was to be headed by two top executives, as a sign that the talks with Gannett weren’t proceeding smoothly.

PRESS RELEASE - DISH and Tribune Broadcasting Reach Agreement on Carriage and Retransmission Consent

Comprehensive Contract Covers 42 Local Television Stations and Cable Net WGN America

Sep 3, 2016
CHICAGO and ENGLEWOOD, Colo.Sept. 3, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Tribune Broadcasting, a subsidiary of Tribune Media (NYSE: TRCO), and DISH Network L.L.C., a wholly-owned subsidiary of DISH Network Corporation (NASDAQ: DISH), today announced a long-term, comprehensive agreement on carriage and retransmission consent.  The agreement restores DISH carriage of Tribune Broadcasting's 42 local television stations in 33 markets, and Tribune's cable network, WGN America.
The companies issued the following joint statement:
"We want to thank our viewers and customers for their patience and support as we worked through this lengthy process.  We're pleased to move forward and again be able to provide the content of Tribune's local stations and WGN America for years to come."
Both WGN America and Tribune's local stations are expected to again be available to DISH customers later today. Terms of the agreement were not disclosed.
ABOUT TRIBUNE MEDIA
Tribune Media Company (NYSE: TRCO) is home to a diverse portfolio of television and digital properties driven by quality news, entertainment and sports programming. Tribune Media is comprised of Tribune Broadcasting's 42 owned or operated local television stations reaching more than 50 million households, national entertainment network WGN America, whose reach is approaching 80 million households, Tribune Studios, and Gracenote, one of the world's leading sources of video, music and sports metadata, powering electronic program guides in televisions, automobiles and mobile devices. TribuneMedia also includes Chicago's WGN-AM and the national multicast networks Antenna TV and THIS TV. Additionally, the Company owns and manages a significant number of real estate properties across the U.S. and holds other strategic investments in media. For more information please visit www.tribunemedia.com.
ABOUT DISH DISH Network Corp. (NASDAQ:DISH), through its subsidiaries, provides approximately 13.593 million pay-TV subscribers, as ofJune 30, 2016, with the highest-quality programming and technology with the most choices at the best value. DISH offers a high definition line-up with more than 200 national HD channels, the most international channels and award-winning HD and DVR technology. DISH Network Corporation is a Fortune 200 company. Visit www.dish.com.
SOURCE Tribune Broadcasting

Friday Afternoon in the Blogosphere


Tronc Dumps Robert Feder - Chicago Patch

New York Times CEO Jokes About Tronc - Fishbowl NY

Tronc executives go on road show to boost stock - New York Post

California Newspapers Get Boost: Repeal Of Sales Tax - Media Post

The Gamble of Tronc’s ‘Just Say No’ Defense - The New York Times

The Pulitzer at 100: Michael Parks and the unraveling of apartheid - Nieman

Washington Post Unveils ‘Lightning-Fast’ Mobile Website - The Wall Street Journal

A Tech Mogul’s Fight to Keep Control of a Newspaper Empire - The New York Times

New York Times Issues Correction to Its Correction About Mistakenly Corrected Story - Slate

New York Times Kills Regional Theater, Restaurant and, Arts Coverage - Deadline Hollywood


Tronc takes over the phones at LA Times

Tronc takes over the phones at LA Times: The new telephones going into the newsroom at the Los Angeles Times carry the Tronc brand.

Today in Labor History

In convention at Topeka, Kan., delegates create the Brotherhood of Railway Carmen of America. The men who repaired the nation's rail cars were paid 10 or 15¢ an hour, working 12 hours a day, often seven days a week - 1890
 
More than a thousand Boston police officers strike after 19 union leaders are fired for organizing activities. Massachusetts Gov. Calvin Coolidge announced that none of the strikers would be rehired, mobilized the state police, and recruited an entirely new police force from among unemployed veterans of the Great War (World War I) - 1919
 
Sixteen striking Filipino sugar workers on the Hawaiian island of Kauai are killed by police; four police died as well. Many of the surviving strikers were jailed, then deported – 1924
United Auto Workers President Leonard Woodcock is named in Pres. Richard Nixon’s “Enemy’s List,” a White House compilation of Americans Nixon regarded as major political opponents.  Another dozen union presidents were added later.  The existence of the list was revealed during Senate Watergate Committee hearings - 1973
September 08
Employers give in to the demands of striking miners in McKees Rocks, Pa., agree to improved working conditions, 15-percent hike in wages and elimination of a "pool system" that gave foremen control over each worker’s pay - 1909
 
Workers give up their Labor Day weekend holidays to keep the munitions factories working to aid in the war effort. Most Labor Day parades are canceled in respect for members of the Armed Services - 1942
 
United Farm Workers union begins historic national grape boycott and strike, Delano, Calif. - 1965
 
Some 2,600 Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) workers begin what is to be a successful 6-day strike for higher pay and against a two-tier wage system - 1997
(In this expanded edition of Strike!, you can read about labor-management conflicts that have occurred over the past 140 years. Here you’ll learn much about workers’ struggle to win a degree of justice, from the workers’ point of view. Brecher also examines the ever-shifting roles and configurations of unions, from the Knights of Labor of the 1800s to the AFL-CIO of the 1990s. A new chapter, “Beyond One-Sided Class War,” looks at how modern protest movements, such as the Battle of Seattle and Occupy Wall Street, were ignited and considers the similarities between these challenges to authority and those of labor’s past.)
September 07
Federal employees win the right to receive Workers' Compensation insurance coverage - 1916
September 06
One of the worst disasters in the history of U.S. anthracite mining occurred at the Avondale Mine, near Scranton, Pa., when a fire originating from a furnace at the bottom of a 237-foot shaft roared up the shaft, killing 110 miners - 1869

Tony Boyle, former president of the United Mine Workers, is charged with murder in the 1969 deaths of former UMW rival Joseph A. Yablonski and his wife and daughter - 1973


September 05
Between 20,000 and 30,000 marchers participate in New York's first Labor Day parade, demanding the 8-hour day - 1882
 
"Palmer raids" on all Wobbly halls and offices in 48 cities in U.S.  Alexander Palmer, U.S. Attorney General, was rounding up radicals and leftists - 1917
 
Ten thousand angry textile strikers, fighting for better wages and working conditions, besiege a factory in Fall River, Mass., where 300 strikebreakers are working. The scabs are rescued by police using tear gas and pistols on the strikers - 1934
 
General strike begins across U.S. maritime industry, stopping all shipping. The strikers were objecting to the government's post-war National Wage Stabilization Board order that reduced pay increases negotiated by maritime unions - 1946