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Wednesday, May 16, 2012

Live Talks Los Angeles

  LiveTalk LA news

Join us for an evening at Live Talks Los Angeles, or at one of our morning business events.  Details below...
Thanks to all who attended our sellout event with Gregg Allman last night. The video from the event will be posted soon exclusively on Bio.com, one of our sponsors and partners. Here are some of our other videos on Bio.com.
  
TOMORROW....
UCLA's Fowler Museum, 7:30pm, $20
UCLA Fowler parking info
"The Joy of Quiet," a New York Times essay by Pico Iyer (12/29/11) inspired this event.
Does the very idea of silence terrify you--or seem impossible to attain in this over-busy world?  Could you live without your cell phone?  (Iyer has yet to own one.) Join us for a spirited discussion about the impact of the 24-7 era of always-on connectedness on our ability to think, create, and participate in the world.  In conversation with journalist, author and KCRW contributor Lisa Napoli. 
In this busy, always-on age, more of us are eager than ever to find ways to disconnect.  This past winter, Pico Iyer (who has yet to own a cell phone) extolled the virtues of peace and quiet.
In the New York Times, he wrote:
“In barely one generation we’ve moved from exulting in the time-saving devices that have so expanded our lives to trying to get away from them — often in order to make more time. The more ways we have to connect, the more many of us seem desperate to unplug. Like teenagers, we appear to have gone from knowing nothing about the world to knowing too much all but overnight.”
Pico Iyer is the author of eight works of non-fiction, including Video Night in Kathmandu,
The Lady and the Monk and The Global Soul. He has also written the novels Cuba and the Night and Abandon. His book, The Open Road, was on 30 years of talking and traveling with the Fourteenth Dalai Lama. His most recent book, The Man Within My Head, is on Graham Greene, hauntedness and fathers.  For 25 years he has been an essayist for Time magazine, and has also contributed to The New York Review of Books, Harper’s, The New York Times and National Geographic. 





Television wouldn't be the same without him.  Marshall created classic hits like Happy Days, Mork and Mindy, Laverne and Shirley, and The Odd Couple. On the big screen, he directed Pretty Woman, Runaway Bride and The Princess Diaries. Spend an evening with this creative force as he looks back on his 50-year career. In conversation with KTLA's Sam Rubin.
Garry Marshall in the news...
- Los Angeles Times,
Garry Marshall recalls happy and not so happy days, May 7
- New York Times, The Shark Jumper, April 27
June 7 -- Pulitzer-prize winning "Mambo King" Oscar Hijuelos
Track 16, Bergamot Station, Santa Monica, 8pm, $20
His novel, The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love, made him the first Latino to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction.  In his memoir, Thoughts without Cigarettes, Hijuelos looks at the people and places that turned this son of Cuban immigrants into a writer. Read a feature on him and an interview on the Biography Channel's website 
June 14 -- Novelist and humorist Christopher Buckley
Track 16, Bergamot Station, Santa Monica, 8pm, $20
From his youthful run as editor of Esquire magazine to a stint as chief speechwriter for George H.W. Bush, Buckley went on to write 15 books that have been translated into 16 languages.  Hear this acclaimed humorist and bestselling author discuss his latest novel, They Eat Puppies, Don't They? 
Aero Theatre, Santa Monica, 8pm, $25
With the publication of his 13th novel, In One Person, legendary author/Oscar winner/wrestling hall-of-famer John Irving makes a rare appearance.  From Setting Free the Bears to Garp to Cider House, this new book is sure to be an instant classic.  Author Abraham Verghese described it this way: "his tender exploration of nascent desire, of love and loss, manages to be sweeping, brilliant, political, provocative, tragic, and funny—it is precisely the kind of astonishing alchemy we associate with a John Irving novel."

Live Talks Business Forums
Start your mornings with Live Talks Business Forums -- 
invigorating discussions with business thought-leaders of today. Coffee, a little nosh and 
soaring views of the city from the 54th Floor of the Wells Fargo Tower (you don't have to be a member of The City Club on Bunker Hill to attend.)
May 31 -- Network executive David Westin on the TV news business
The City Club, $20 -- includes continental breakfast (7:45am) & Forum (8:15-9:15am)
Former ABC News President David Westin's new book, Exit Interview, takes you inside the newsroom he ran during a pivotal time in media.  Anchorwoman and Huffington Post senior editor Willow Bay leads him in conversation about the industry, and Westin's central question: Is it possible for journalists to be both good at their jobs and people of good moral character?
June 14 -- Behavioral economist Dan Ariely on why we lie (and how we can stop)
The City Club, $20 -- includes continental breakfast (7:45am) & Forum (8:15-9:15am)
Duke professor Dan Ariely's New York Times bestsellers Predictably Irrational and The Upside of Irrationality have established himself as an authority when it comes to understanding how irrational behavior shapes every part of our lives in surprisingly predictable ways.  Joanna Pearlstein of Wired magazine leads him in conversation on his new book The Honest Truth About Dishonesty.

June 22 -- Bestselling author Scott Turow on the future of publishingThe City Club, $20 -- includes continental breakfast (7:45am) & Forum (8:15-9:15am) 
In the age of e-readers and dwindling attention spans, publishing is struggling to adapt and make peace with the digital universe. Scott Turow observes this from two perches. He is the author of bestsellers, including Presumed Innocent, Innocent, One L, and Ultimate Punishment.  And he is the current president of The Authors Guild, the leading advocate for writers’ interests.  In conversation with Carolyn Kellogg of the Los Angeles Times.


Thank you for supporting our events,

Go on gently,

Your friends at Live Talks Los Angeles
www.livetalksla.org

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